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The Impact of Job Crafting on Workplace Well Being in Teaching Professionals


Affiliations
1 Assistant Professor, Department of Business Administration, GDC Boys Udhampur, J&K, India
2 Assistant Professor, Department of HRM & OB, Central University of Jammu, J&K,, India

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The purpose of the present study is to investigate the impact of job crafting on workplace well being. The concept of job crafting got its identity from the job demands and resources model. Based on the prior job demands and resources model studies, it was hypothesized that the job crafting has an impact on the well being of employees. The hypotheses were tested using descriptive as well as inferential statistics. It was found that there is a dearth of studies on the well being of teaching professionals working in the colleges, especially government degree colleges. So, the study was conducted on the teachers teaching in the government degree colleges (N = 464) of Jammu and Kashmir using questionnaire based on the structured instruments which have already been validated and extensively used. The research methodology adopted included Correlation, Regression and Structural Equation modelling. The results confirmed that the job crafting has actually helped the teaching professionals to get engaged in their work by increasing their workplace well being.

Keywords

Job crafting, Job demands, Job resources, Well being, Workplace well being.
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  • The Impact of Job Crafting on Workplace Well Being in Teaching Professionals

Abstract Views: 134  | 

Authors

Pallavi Bhagat
Assistant Professor, Department of Business Administration, GDC Boys Udhampur, J&K, India
Neelika Arora
Assistant Professor, Department of HRM & OB, Central University of Jammu, J&K,, India

Abstract


The purpose of the present study is to investigate the impact of job crafting on workplace well being. The concept of job crafting got its identity from the job demands and resources model. Based on the prior job demands and resources model studies, it was hypothesized that the job crafting has an impact on the well being of employees. The hypotheses were tested using descriptive as well as inferential statistics. It was found that there is a dearth of studies on the well being of teaching professionals working in the colleges, especially government degree colleges. So, the study was conducted on the teachers teaching in the government degree colleges (N = 464) of Jammu and Kashmir using questionnaire based on the structured instruments which have already been validated and extensively used. The research methodology adopted included Correlation, Regression and Structural Equation modelling. The results confirmed that the job crafting has actually helped the teaching professionals to get engaged in their work by increasing their workplace well being.

Keywords


Job crafting, Job demands, Job resources, Well being, Workplace well being.

References