Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access

Workers Work-Life Balance Should be a Human Resource Priority


Affiliations
1 PhD Scholar, Department of Business Administration, Faculty of Commerce, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Associate Professor, Department of Business Administration, Faculty of Commerce, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India

   Subscribe/Renew Journal


Workers would not like to sacrifice their personal lives because of their job imperatives. Work and personal life are essentially two different scales of a spring balance and any adverse movement either at the workplace or in personal life would disturb the balance. Work-life balance has always been fraught with challenges which have of late assumed significant proportions and is considered to be the most pressing concern for the workers today. It has been observed that the population of working couples has been on the increase and this has led to greater scope for work-life conflict for them. Organizations are realizing that the quality of the workers’ personal lives has a direct bearing on their job performance. This underscores the need for the organizations to promote work-life balance measures to safeguard their business interests. In this paper, we have made an attempt to highlight why work-life balance policies should be promoted and form a core part of an organizations Human Resource policy to optimize their business interests.

Keywords

Human resources, Organization, Work-life balance, Worker.
User
Subscription Login to verify subscription
Notifications
Font Size

  • J. H. Greenhaus, Collins, and J. D. Shaw, “The relation between work-family roles,” Academy of Management Review, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 76-88, 2003.
  • O. R. Igbinomwanhia, O. Iyayi, and F. Iyayi, “Employee work-life balance as an HR imperative,” African Research Review, vol. 6, no. 3, p. 110, 2012.
  • M. Valcour, “Work based resources as moderators of the relationship between work hours and satisfaction with work-family balance,” Journal of Applied Psychology, vol. 92, no. 6, pp. 1512-1523, 2007.
  • S. C. Clark, “Work/family border theory: A new theory of work/family balance,” Human Relations, vol. 53, no. 6, pp. 747-770, 2000.
  • N. R. Lockwood, Work/Life Balance: Challenges and Solutions (Research Quarterly). Society for Human Resource Management, VA: Alexandria, 2003.
  • T. D. Allen, D. E. L. Herst, C. S. Bruck, and M. Sutton, “Consequences associated with work to family conflict: A review and agenda for future research,” Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, vol. 5, pp. 287-308, 2000.
  • G. Lowe, “Under pressure: Implications of work-life balance and job stress,” Human Solutions. Human Solutions Report 2006-07, 2006.
  • S. I. Ojo, and C. Mordi, “Work-life balance practices in the banking sector: Insights from Nigeria,” IFE Psychologica. IFE Centre for Psychological Studies, 2011.
  • D. F. Elloy, and C. R. Smith, “Patterns of stress, work-family conflict, role conflict, role ambiguity and overload among dual career couples: An Australian study,” Cross Cultural Management, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 55-66, 2003.
  • H. B. Reynolds, “It is not enough to offer work/life programmes - You need promote them,” Benefits Quarterly, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 13-17, 1999.
  • M. Parker, M. Wickham, and S. Fishwick, “Exploring a work-life balance impact audit: An aid to informed consensus?,” Proceedings of the 20th ANZAM Conference on “Management: Pragmatism, Philosophy, Priorities”, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Dec. 6-9, 2006.
  • R. Baral, and S. Bhargava, “HR interventions for worklife balance: Evidences from organizations in India,” International Journal of Business, Management and Social Sciences, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 33-42, 2011.
  • N. Spinks, “Work-life balance: Achievable goal or pipe dream?,” The Journal of Quality and Participation, vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 4-11, 2004.
  • S. Dex, and C. Smith, The Nature and Pattern of Family-Friendly Employment Policies in Britain. Bristol: The Policy Press for Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 2002.
  • M. Blair-Loy, and A. S. Wharton, “Employees use of work-family policies and the workplace social context,” Social Forces, vol. 80, pp. 813-845, 2002.

Abstract Views: 289




  • Workers Work-Life Balance Should be a Human Resource Priority

Abstract Views: 289  | 

Authors

Anurag Shanker
PhD Scholar, Department of Business Administration, Faculty of Commerce, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
Shailesh Kumar Kaushal
Associate Professor, Department of Business Administration, Faculty of Commerce, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India

Abstract


Workers would not like to sacrifice their personal lives because of their job imperatives. Work and personal life are essentially two different scales of a spring balance and any adverse movement either at the workplace or in personal life would disturb the balance. Work-life balance has always been fraught with challenges which have of late assumed significant proportions and is considered to be the most pressing concern for the workers today. It has been observed that the population of working couples has been on the increase and this has led to greater scope for work-life conflict for them. Organizations are realizing that the quality of the workers’ personal lives has a direct bearing on their job performance. This underscores the need for the organizations to promote work-life balance measures to safeguard their business interests. In this paper, we have made an attempt to highlight why work-life balance policies should be promoted and form a core part of an organizations Human Resource policy to optimize their business interests.

Keywords


Human resources, Organization, Work-life balance, Worker.

References