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Impact of Remittances on Exports and Economic Growth: A Cross Country Analysis


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1 Department of Economics, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190006, Jammu and Kashmir, India
     

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We present robust results on the impact of remittances on exports and economic growth for panel data sets of 38 high-income and 54 middle-income countries for 2000-2020. First, we estimate the impact of remittances on exports after controlling economic growth. By panel dynamic panel estimation, when regressing remittances on exports, remittances show an inverse U-shaped relationship with a threshold value of ln(12.63) for high-income and ln(15.66) middle-income countries above which exports begin to fall. Economic growth is showing a positive and significant impact on exports. Second, we estimate the impact of remittances and exports on economic growth after controlling various macro determinants of economic growth. On economic growth, remittances present a U-shaped relationship with threshold value ln(12.63) for higher income and ln(15.66) for lower-income countries above which economic growth starts to rise. Exports are showing a positive and significant effect on economic growth. A 100 per cent increase in exports leads to a 15 per cent and 12 per cent increase in economic growth of high-income and middle-income countries. The other variables like physical capital per labour and human capital are showing positive and significant impact on economic growth. Government expenditure has a negative coefficient; thus deteriorates economic growth.
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  • Impact of Remittances on Exports and Economic Growth: A Cross Country Analysis

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Authors

Imtiyaz Ahmad Shah
Department of Economics, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190006, Jammu and Kashmir, India
Imtiyaz ul Haq
Department of Economics, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190006, Jammu and Kashmir, India

Abstract


We present robust results on the impact of remittances on exports and economic growth for panel data sets of 38 high-income and 54 middle-income countries for 2000-2020. First, we estimate the impact of remittances on exports after controlling economic growth. By panel dynamic panel estimation, when regressing remittances on exports, remittances show an inverse U-shaped relationship with a threshold value of ln(12.63) for high-income and ln(15.66) middle-income countries above which exports begin to fall. Economic growth is showing a positive and significant impact on exports. Second, we estimate the impact of remittances and exports on economic growth after controlling various macro determinants of economic growth. On economic growth, remittances present a U-shaped relationship with threshold value ln(12.63) for higher income and ln(15.66) for lower-income countries above which economic growth starts to rise. Exports are showing a positive and significant effect on economic growth. A 100 per cent increase in exports leads to a 15 per cent and 12 per cent increase in economic growth of high-income and middle-income countries. The other variables like physical capital per labour and human capital are showing positive and significant impact on economic growth. Government expenditure has a negative coefficient; thus deteriorates economic growth.

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.21648/arthavij%2F2022%2Fv64%2Fi3%2F215280