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Overcoming the Barriers Of Utilization of Mica Waste as a Potassic Fertilizer


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1 Division of Soil Chemistry and Fertility, ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal 462 038, India
2 Division of Soil Bio-logy, ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal 462 038, India
 

Mica waste generated after cleaning and processing mica ore contains about 8–10% potassium (K). Its poten-tial as an alternative to costly potassic fertilizers is currently being exploited, especially in India, where the entire demand for K fertilizers is met through imports. Suitable modifications of mica waste by chemical and biologi-cal means may prove to be an agricultural resource. However, its practical utilization is obstructed by certain challenges, as discussed here, which need to be addressed in order to reduce India’s dependency on imports of K fertilizers and take a step forward towards a self-reliant India

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  • IBM, Indian Minerals Yearbook 2018 (Part-III: Mineral Reviews), Minor Minerals 30.16 Mica (Final Release), Ministry of Mines, In-dian Bureau of Mines, Government of India, Indira Bhavan, Civil Lines, Nagpur, 2019, pp. 1–5, 57th edn,.
  • Basak, B. B., Nat. Resour. Res., 2019, 28, 953–965.
  • Pramanik, P., Kalita, C., Borah, K. and Kalita, P., Agroecol. Sustain. Food Syst., 2021, 45, 732–774.
  • Ahmad, A., Chattopadhyay, N., Mandal, J., Mandal, N. and Ghosh, M., J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 2020, 68(4), 431–442.

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  • Overcoming the Barriers Of Utilization of Mica Waste as a Potassic Fertilizer

Abstract Views: 14  |  PDF Views: 3

Authors

Khushboo Rani
Division of Soil Chemistry and Fertility, ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal 462 038, India
Abinash Das
Division of Soil Bio-logy, ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal 462 038, India

Abstract


Mica waste generated after cleaning and processing mica ore contains about 8–10% potassium (K). Its poten-tial as an alternative to costly potassic fertilizers is currently being exploited, especially in India, where the entire demand for K fertilizers is met through imports. Suitable modifications of mica waste by chemical and biologi-cal means may prove to be an agricultural resource. However, its practical utilization is obstructed by certain challenges, as discussed here, which need to be addressed in order to reduce India’s dependency on imports of K fertilizers and take a step forward towards a self-reliant India

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No keywords.

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.18520/cs%2Fv123%2Fi2%2F141-142