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Tradition In Transition: The Transformation of Traditional Agriculture in Arunachal Pradesh, North East India


Affiliations
1 Department of Botany, Rajiv Gandhi University, Rono Hills, Doimukh 791 112, India
2 Central Agroforestry Research Institute, Indian Council of Agricultural Research, Jhansi-Gwalior Road, Jhansi 284 003, India
 

It has been observed recently that the majority of far-mers in North East India have shifted their attention towards traditional agroforestry practices owing to their economic and ecological values. We conducted an extensive survey in three districts of Arunachal Pra-desh, India, namely, Kra Daadi, Lower Subansiri and Papum Pare. The study focused on the imperative of agroforestry practices in terms of socio-economy, live-lihood, food security and the existing constraints ham-pering the development of agroforestry practices. The traditional agroforestry has replaced the old way of jhumming that registered a decline of at least 70%–80% during the last 15 years. The practice of tradi-tional agroforestry in this region displayed several so-cial, environmental and economic benefits leading to the growth of adoption for sustainable development.

Keywords

Jhum Cultivation, Livelihood, Socio-economy, Sustainable Development, Traditional Agroforestry
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  • Tradition In Transition: The Transformation of Traditional Agriculture in Arunachal Pradesh, North East India

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Authors

Toku Bani
Department of Botany, Rajiv Gandhi University, Rono Hills, Doimukh 791 112, India
Mundeep Deuri
Department of Botany, Rajiv Gandhi University, Rono Hills, Doimukh 791 112, India
Tonlong Wangpan
Department of Botany, Rajiv Gandhi University, Rono Hills, Doimukh 791 112, India
Sumpam Tangjang
Department of Botany, Rajiv Gandhi University, Rono Hills, Doimukh 791 112, India
A. Arunachalam
Central Agroforestry Research Institute, Indian Council of Agricultural Research, Jhansi-Gwalior Road, Jhansi 284 003, India

Abstract


It has been observed recently that the majority of far-mers in North East India have shifted their attention towards traditional agroforestry practices owing to their economic and ecological values. We conducted an extensive survey in three districts of Arunachal Pra-desh, India, namely, Kra Daadi, Lower Subansiri and Papum Pare. The study focused on the imperative of agroforestry practices in terms of socio-economy, live-lihood, food security and the existing constraints ham-pering the development of agroforestry practices. The traditional agroforestry has replaced the old way of jhumming that registered a decline of at least 70%–80% during the last 15 years. The practice of tradi-tional agroforestry in this region displayed several so-cial, environmental and economic benefits leading to the growth of adoption for sustainable development.

Keywords


Jhum Cultivation, Livelihood, Socio-economy, Sustainable Development, Traditional Agroforestry

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.18520/cs%2Fv123%2Fi2%2F220-225