Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access

Alternative herbal medicine in bovine mastitis: A comprehensive review


Affiliations
1 Department of Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology, India
2 DGCN College of Veterinary and Animal Sciences CSK Himachal Pradesh Krishi Vishvavidyalaya, Palampur-176 062., India
 

Bovine Mastitis is the most widespread disease in dairy cattle occurring throughout the world. The disease is causing huge economic losses particularly in developing countries like India in terms of reduced milk production, costs on treatment, culling of chronically infected cows and occasional deaths. Moreover, mastitis has a serious zoonotic potential associated with shedding of bacteria and their toxins in the milk. The treatment of choice for mastitis is the administration of antibiotics. However, antibiotics used for the treatment of this disease are causing antibiotic resistance and its residues passes in milk. Phytochemicals isolated from plants have exhibited potent activities against bacteria causing mastitis. These agents can act alone or in combination with antibiotics to enhance the antibacterial activity against a wide range of bacteria. The drugs from plants are less toxic; side effects are scanty and are also cost effective. They are effective in the treatment of infectious diseases while simultaneously mitigating many of the side effects that are often associated with synthetic antimicrobials. This comprehensive review was prepared to know different studies on usage of various alternative medicines in relation to bovine mastitis.

Keywords

Antibiotic resistance, Bovine mastitis, Phytochemicals, Zoonotic.
User
Notifications
Font Size

  • Azadi HG and Farzaneh N. 2010. Comparison of two regimens of Nigella sativa extract for treatment of subclinical mastitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus. American Journal of Applied Sciences 7 (9): 1210-1214.
  • Bae H, Jeong CH, Cheng WN, Hong K, Seo HG and Han SG. 2017. Oxidative stress-induced inflammatory responses and effects of N-acetylcysteine in bovine mammary alveolar cells. Journal of Dairy Research 84 (4): 418-425.
  • Baskaran SA, Kazmer GW, Hinckley L, Andrew SM and Venkitanarayanan K. 2009. Antibacterial effect of plantderived antimicrobials on major bacterial mastitis pathogens in vitro. Journal of Dairy Science 92 (4): 1423-1429.
  • Benavides ML, Lombard J, Raymond J, Hemling T and Timms L. 2016. Trends in the USA that are challenging the status quo in milking routines. Proceedings of the New Zealand Milk Quallity Conference, ISSN 2253- 5349.
  • Bhanderi BM and Garg MR. 2012. A study on reducing the incidence ofsub-clinical mastitisin dairy cows by feeding a vitamins and minerals based strategic feed supplement. IndianJournalofDairyScience65:388-392.
  • Bharti SK, Sharma NK, Gupta AK, Murari K and Kumar A. 2012. Pharmacological actions and potential uses of diverse galactogogues in cattle. International Journal of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics 2 (1): 24-28.
  • , Boddie RL, Nickerson SC and Adkinson RW. 1993. Evaluation of teat germicides of low iodine concentrations for prevention of bovine mastitis by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae. Preventive Veterinary Medicine 16 (2): 111-117.
  • Buhner SH. 2014. Herbal antibiotics: an effective defense against drug resistant ‘Superbugs’. Mother Earth News, https://www.mothe r e a rthnews. com/na tur a lhealth/herbal-antibiotics-defense-zm0z13djzsor/.
  • Castillo C, Hernandez J, Valverde I, Pereira V, Sotillo J, Alonso ML and Benedito JL. 2006. Plasma malonaldehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant status (TAS) during lactation in dairy cows. Research in Veterinary Science 80 (2): 133-139.
  • Cheng WN, Jeong CH, Seo HG and Han SG. 2019. Moringa extract attenuates inflammatory responses and increases gene expression of casein in bovine mammary epithelial cells. Animals 9 (7): 391.
  • Decoursey TE and Ligeti E. 2005. Regulation and termination of NADPH oxidase activity. Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences CMLS 62 (19): 2173-2193.
  • Dragana ZT, Jovan BS, Ivan MG, Zoran NR, Tijana BK, Nadežda BT, Blagoje PPand Zorana RK. 2022. Review of trends in essential oils as alternatives to antibiotics in bovine mastitis treatment. Matica Srpska Journal for Natural Sciences 142: 47-60.
  • Forno-Bell N, Bucarey SA, García D, Iragüen D, Chacón O and San Martín B. 2019. Antimicrobial Effects caused by Aloe barbadensis miller on bacteria associated with mastitis in dairy cattle. Natural Product Communications 14 (12).
  • Garcia A. 2004. Contagious vs. Environmental Mastitis. Ex t e n si o n Ex tr a . Pa p e r 1 2 6 . Ac c e ss a t http://agbiopubs.sdstate.edu/articles/ExEx4028.pdf.
  • Gupta A, Mahajan S and Sharma R. 2015. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of Curcuma longa rhizome extract against Staphylococcus aureus. Biotechnology reports 1 (6): 51-55.
  • Hamadani H, Khan AA, Banday MT, Ashraf I, Handoo N, Bashir A and Hamadani A. 2013. Bovine mastitis- A disease of serious concern for dairy farmers. International Journal of Livestock Research 3 (1): 42- 55.
  • Hassan H, Murad W, Tariq A and Ahmad A. 2014. Ethnoveterinary study of medicinal plants in Malakand Valley, district Dir (lower), Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. Irish Veterinary Journal 67 (1): 1-6.
  • Jozwik A, Krzyzewski J, Strzalkowska N, Polawska E, Bagnicka E,Wierzbicka A, Niemczuk K, Lipinska Pand Horbanczuk JO. 2012. Relations between the oxidative status, mastitis, milk quality and disorders of reproductive functions in dairy cows – a review. Animal Science Papers and Reports 30 (4): 297-307.
  • Loboda A, Damulewicz M, Pyza E, Jozkowicz Aand Dulak J. 2016. Role of Nrf2/HO-1 system in development, oxidative stress response and diseases: an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences 73 (17): 3221-3247.
  • Matekaire T and Bwakura TM. 2004. Ethnoveterinary medicine: A potential alternative to orthodox animal health delivery in Zimbabwe. International Journal of Applied Research in Veterinary Medicine 2 (4): 269- 273.
  • Mukherjee R, Dash PK and Ram GC. 2005. Immunotherapeutic potential of Ocimum sanctum (L) in bovine subclinical mastitis. Research in Veterinary Science 79 (1): 37-43.
  • Mullen KA, Sparks LG, Lyman RL, Washburn SP and Anderson KL. 2013. Comparisons of milk quality on North Carolina organic and conventional dairies. Journal of Dairy Science 96 (10): 6753-6762.
  • Ogbueniu IP, Odomenam VU, Obikaonu HO, Opara MN, Emenalom OO, Uchegbu, MC, Okoli IC, Esonu BO and Loej MU. 2011. The growing importance of neem (Azadirachta indica) in agriculture industry, medicine and environment: A Review. Research Journal of Medicinal Plants 5: 230-245.
  • Oliver SP and Murinda SE. 2012. Antimicrobial resistance of mastitis pathogens. Veterinary Clinics of North America: Food Animal Practice 28 (2): 165-185.
  • Pankey JW, Eberhart RJ, Cuming AL, Daggett RD, Farnsworth RJ and McDuff CK. 1984. Uptake on post milking teat antisepsis. Journal of Dairy Science 67 (6): 1336-1353.
  • Pinedo P, Karreman H, Bothe H, Velez J, and Risco C. 2013. Efficacy of a botanical preparation for the intramammary treatment of clinical mastitis on an organic dairy farm. The Canadian Veterinary Journal 54 (5): 479.
  • Pyorala S. 2003. Indicators of inflammation in the diagnosis of mastitis. Veterinary Research 34 (5): 565-578.
  • Radostits OM, Gay CC, Hinchcliff KW and Constable PD. 2007. Atextbook of the diseases of cattle, horses, sheep, pigs and goats P- 2045-2050.
  • Radostits OM, Blood DC and Gay CC. 2010. Veterinary medicine—Atextbook of diseases of cattle, sheep, pigs, th goats and horses (8 ed.) Bailliere Tindall, London. P1507–1516.
  • Rastogi S, Pandey MK, Prakash J, Sharma Aand Singh GN. 2015. Veterinary herbal medicines in India. Pharmacognosy Reviews 9 (18): 155.
  • Raut JS and Karuppayil SM., 2014. A status review on the medicinal properties of essential oils. Industrial crops and Products 62 :250-264.
  • Reshi AA, Husain I, Bhat SA, Rehman MU, Razak R, Bilal S and Mir MR. 2015. Bovine mastitis as an evolving disease and its impact on the dairy industry. International Journal of Current Research and Review 7(5): 48.
  • Sahoo N, Manchikanti P and Dey S. 2010. Herbal drugs: standards and regulation. Fitoterapia 81 (6): 462-471.
  • Shi H, Yan S, Jin L, Shi B and Guo X. 2016. Vitamin A affects the expression of antioxidant genes in bovine mammary epithelial cells with oxidative stress induced by diethylene triamine-nitric oxide polymer. Czech Journal of Animal Science 61 (3): 117-126.
  • Smith KL, Todhunter DA and Schoenberger PS. 1985. Environmental mastitis: cause, prevalence, prevention. Journal of Dairy Science 68 (6): 1531-53.
  • Wang X, Stavchansky S, Zhao B, Bynum JA, Kerwin SM and Bowman PD. 2008. Cytoprotection of human endothelial cells from menadione cytotoxicityby caffeic acid phenethyl ester: the role of heme oxygenase-1. European Journal of Pharmacology 591: 28–35.
  • Zhu H, Du M, Fox Land Zhu MJ. 2016. Bactericidal effects of Cinnamon cassia oil against bovine mastitis bacterial pathogens. Food Control 66: 291-299

Abstract Views: 144

PDF Views: 0




  • Alternative herbal medicine in bovine mastitis: A comprehensive review

Abstract Views: 144  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Dinesh Kumar Sharma
Department of Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology, India
Pardeep Sharma
DGCN College of Veterinary and Animal Sciences CSK Himachal Pradesh Krishi Vishvavidyalaya, Palampur-176 062., India

Abstract


Bovine Mastitis is the most widespread disease in dairy cattle occurring throughout the world. The disease is causing huge economic losses particularly in developing countries like India in terms of reduced milk production, costs on treatment, culling of chronically infected cows and occasional deaths. Moreover, mastitis has a serious zoonotic potential associated with shedding of bacteria and their toxins in the milk. The treatment of choice for mastitis is the administration of antibiotics. However, antibiotics used for the treatment of this disease are causing antibiotic resistance and its residues passes in milk. Phytochemicals isolated from plants have exhibited potent activities against bacteria causing mastitis. These agents can act alone or in combination with antibiotics to enhance the antibacterial activity against a wide range of bacteria. The drugs from plants are less toxic; side effects are scanty and are also cost effective. They are effective in the treatment of infectious diseases while simultaneously mitigating many of the side effects that are often associated with synthetic antimicrobials. This comprehensive review was prepared to know different studies on usage of various alternative medicines in relation to bovine mastitis.

Keywords


Antibiotic resistance, Bovine mastitis, Phytochemicals, Zoonotic.

References