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Trends and Pattern of Population Ageing in India and West Bengal:A Comparative Study


Affiliations
1 Dept. of Commerce, Kalipada Ghosh Tarai Mahavidyalaya, Siliguri, West Bengal, India
2 Dept. of Economics, University of North Bengal, Siliguri, West Bengal, India
 

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Population ageing is a global issue which has multi-dimensional impacts on all economic issues of a nation. It is related to many demographic and vital statistics, economic status, health and social status of population. There is a huge variation of population ageing in India varying over state to state, religion to religion, community to community, locality of residences and sex etc. Remarkable shrinkages of population pyramids on population for India and West Bengal over 2001–2011 indicates a decline in fertility leading to an increase in the proportion of elderly population. Attempts have been made to assess ageing and its related aspects in India and West Bengal. Correlation and regression analysis have been employed to study impacts of % decadal growth rate of elderly in general population and human development index. The present study stands for a strong evidence for the Preston’s hypothesis that individuals born in richer countries, on an average, can expect to live longer than those born in poor countries.

Keywords

Per cent of Elderly, Life Expectancy, Population Pyramid, Old-Age Dependency, Economic Independence, Economically Dependence.
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  • Trends and Pattern of Population Ageing in India and West Bengal:A Comparative Study

Abstract Views: 236  |  PDF Views: 145

Authors

Archita Nayak
Dept. of Commerce, Kalipada Ghosh Tarai Mahavidyalaya, Siliguri, West Bengal, India
K. K. Bagchi
Dept. of Economics, University of North Bengal, Siliguri, West Bengal, India

Abstract


Population ageing is a global issue which has multi-dimensional impacts on all economic issues of a nation. It is related to many demographic and vital statistics, economic status, health and social status of population. There is a huge variation of population ageing in India varying over state to state, religion to religion, community to community, locality of residences and sex etc. Remarkable shrinkages of population pyramids on population for India and West Bengal over 2001–2011 indicates a decline in fertility leading to an increase in the proportion of elderly population. Attempts have been made to assess ageing and its related aspects in India and West Bengal. Correlation and regression analysis have been employed to study impacts of % decadal growth rate of elderly in general population and human development index. The present study stands for a strong evidence for the Preston’s hypothesis that individuals born in richer countries, on an average, can expect to live longer than those born in poor countries.

Keywords


Per cent of Elderly, Life Expectancy, Population Pyramid, Old-Age Dependency, Economic Independence, Economically Dependence.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.17492/pragati.v4i02.11466