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Bridging the Skill Gap in the Indian Food Processing Sector: A Review


Affiliations
1 Department of Humanities, Science, Education and Research, PSS Central Institute of Vocational Education, Bhopal – 462002, Madhya Pradesh, India
 

India has become one of the fastest growing economies in the world today, with a growth rate of 7.2% on an annual basis. The GDP growth rate for 2021 was recorded at 8.95%, indicating a significant increase of 15.54% from 2020. The food processing sector has contributed to this growth significantly as India is one of the world's largest producers of rice, wheat, milk, pulses, a variety of fruits and vegetables. The food processing sector witnessed growth of 11.8% CAGR during 2015-16 to 2018-19 and is currently embracing automation, mechanization and technology to boost production and optimize resource utilisation. The changing face of the industry calls for a number of technical and specialised skills. The Food Processing Industry is predicted to create approximately 44.34 million new jobs by 2022, largely in entry-level and supervisory positions. However, the Food Processing Industry will face a substantial challenge as a result of the industrial revolution. Currently, the agri-food processing sector employs approximately 44% of the workforce, with the majority of workers lacking any formal or informal skill training. As a result, they are unable to make the most of their job. This presents both a challenge and an opportunity to skill the fresher as well as the existing workforce in India with the goal of increasing production and income. Addressing the existing skill gaps between the labour force and industrial demands is essential if the food processing sector is to realise its full potential. In this review, we offer an overview of the food processing industry, employment generation capacities, and skill gaps existing in the Indian food processing industry. The review also presents literature on the major skilling initiatives and strategies for bridging the skill gap in the food processing industry.

Keywords

Food Industry, Food Processing, Government Policies, Skilling, Skill Gap, Skill India, Vocational Education, Workforce
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  • Bridging the Skill Gap in the Indian Food Processing Sector: A Review

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Authors

Preeti Dixit
Department of Humanities, Science, Education and Research, PSS Central Institute of Vocational Education, Bhopal – 462002, Madhya Pradesh, India
R. Ravichandran
Department of Humanities, Science, Education and Research, PSS Central Institute of Vocational Education, Bhopal – 462002, Madhya Pradesh, India

Abstract


India has become one of the fastest growing economies in the world today, with a growth rate of 7.2% on an annual basis. The GDP growth rate for 2021 was recorded at 8.95%, indicating a significant increase of 15.54% from 2020. The food processing sector has contributed to this growth significantly as India is one of the world's largest producers of rice, wheat, milk, pulses, a variety of fruits and vegetables. The food processing sector witnessed growth of 11.8% CAGR during 2015-16 to 2018-19 and is currently embracing automation, mechanization and technology to boost production and optimize resource utilisation. The changing face of the industry calls for a number of technical and specialised skills. The Food Processing Industry is predicted to create approximately 44.34 million new jobs by 2022, largely in entry-level and supervisory positions. However, the Food Processing Industry will face a substantial challenge as a result of the industrial revolution. Currently, the agri-food processing sector employs approximately 44% of the workforce, with the majority of workers lacking any formal or informal skill training. As a result, they are unable to make the most of their job. This presents both a challenge and an opportunity to skill the fresher as well as the existing workforce in India with the goal of increasing production and income. Addressing the existing skill gaps between the labour force and industrial demands is essential if the food processing sector is to realise its full potential. In this review, we offer an overview of the food processing industry, employment generation capacities, and skill gaps existing in the Indian food processing industry. The review also presents literature on the major skilling initiatives and strategies for bridging the skill gap in the food processing industry.

Keywords


Food Industry, Food Processing, Government Policies, Skilling, Skill Gap, Skill India, Vocational Education, Workforce

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.15613/fijrfn%2F2022%2Fv9i2%2F217902