Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access
Open Access Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Restricted Access Subscription Access

Relationship Intimacy and Life Satisfaction among Married Men and Women of Kerala


Affiliations
1 Christ College Autonomous, Irinjalakuda, Kerala, India
     

   Subscribe/Renew Journal


The redefinition of health over time has given immense importance to the overall well-being of a person beyond the physical wellness and lack of diseases or infirmity. Life satisfaction being a cognitive component of well-being is a widely studied concept as it is related to the health of people. With the growth of the biopsychosocial model of health, social and psychological factors have become equally important in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of illnesses. Social relationships are one of the major social determinants which influences the life of a person and thereby the present study tries to relate the factors of life satisfaction and relationship intimacy. A gender perspective within the embedded social grounds were given significance to comprehend the results better. The study was conducted on a sample of 28 married men and 59 married women of Kerala. The tools used for the statistical study were the PAIR intimacy scale Schaefer and Olson (1981) and the Satisfaction with life scale (Diener, 1985). Correlations, Regressions and t-tests were conducted to reach the significant conclusions. The study concluded that there is no significant difference in the Relationship intimacy and Life satisfaction of married men and women, while the correlation between these variables are significantly positive. It is also revealed that this correlation is significant only in the case of married men and not in the case of married women of Kerala. It is concluded through the results that relationship intimacy predicts life satisfaction among married men. Limitation and future possibilities of the study have also been discussed in the paper.


Keywords

Gender Perspective, Life satisfaction, Marriage, Relationship Intimacy.
Subscription Login to verify subscription
User
Notifications
Font Size


  • Boehm, J. K., Winning, A., Segerstrom, S., & Kubzansky, L. D. (2015). Variability modifies life satisfaction's association with mortality risk in older adults. Psychological Science, 26(7), 1063-1070.
  • Bolton, D., & Gillett, G. (2019). The biopsychosocial model of health and disease: New philosophical and scientific developments (p. 149). Springer Nature.
  • Bowen, M. (1993). Family therapy in clinical practice. Jason Aronson.
  • Callahan, D. (1973). The WHO definition of' health'. Hastings Center Studies, 1(3), 77-87.
  • Devika, J. (2019). Women's labour, patriarchy and feminism in twenty-first century Kerala: Reflections on the glocal present. Review of Development and Change, 24(1), 79-99.
  • Diener, E.D., Emmons, R.A., Larsen, R.J., & Griffin, S. (1985). The Satisfaction with Life Scale. Journal of Personality Assessment, 49(1), 71-75. Doi:10.1207/s15327752jpa4901_13
  • Eapen, M. (2002). Mental health of women in Kerala: the need for a gender perspective. Samyukta: A Journal of Women's Studies, 2(2), 25–38.
  • Geiss, S. K., & O'Leary, K. D. (1981). Therapist ratings of frequency and severity of marital problems: Implications for research. Journal of Marital and Family
  • Therapy, 7(4), 515-520.
  • Greeff, P., Hildegarde, L., & Malherbe, A. (2001). Intimacy and marital satisfaction in spouses. Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, 27(3), 247-257.
  • Halbreich, U. (2022). Well-being: Diversified perspectives in search of operational definitions. International Journal of Social Psychiatry, 68(4), 705-707. Hutchinson, D. L. (2000). Identity crisis: Intersectionality, multidimensionality, and the development of an adequate theory of subordination. Michigan Journal of Race and Law., 6, 285.
  • Kerr, M. E., Bowen, M., & Kerr, M. E. (1988). Family evaluation. WW Norton and Company.
  • Kingsbury, N. M., & Minda, R. B. (1988). An analysis of three expected intimate relationship states: Commitment, maintenance and termination. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 5(4), 405-422.
  • Locke, H. J., & Wallace, K. M. (1959). Short marital-adjustment and prediction tests: Their reliability and validity. Marriage and Family Living, 21(3), 251-255. Lundblad, A. M., & Hansson, K. (2006). Couples therapy: Effectiveness of treatment and long‐term follow‐up. Journal of Family Therapy, 28(2), 136-152.
  • Myers, J. E., Madathil, J., & Tingle, L. R. (2005). Marriage satisfaction and wellness in India and the United States: A preliminary comparison of arranged marriages and marriages of choice. Journal of Counseling and Development, 83(2), 183-190.
  • Neto, F. (1993). The Satisfaction with Life Scale: Psychometrics properties in an adolescent sample. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 22(2), 125-134.
  • Proctor, C., Linley, P. A., & Maltby, J. (2017). Life satisfaction. Encyclopedia of Adolescence, 2(1), s2165-2176.
  • Schaefer, M. T., & Olson, D. H. (1981). Assessing intimacy: The PAIR inventory. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 7(1), 47-60.
  • Seligman, M. E., & Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2014). Positive psychology: An introduction. In Flow and the foundations of positive psychology (pp. 279-298). Springer, Dordrecht.
  • Siedlecki, K. L., Salthouse, T. A., Oishi, S., & Jeswani, S. (2014). The relationship between social support and subjective well-being across age. Social Indicators Research, 117(2), 561-576.
  • Sousa, L., & Lyubomirsky, S. (2001). Life satisfaction. Encylopedia of Women and Gender: Sex Similarities and Differences and the impact of Society on Gender, 2, 667-676.
  • Sternberg, R. J. (1986). A triangular theory of love. Psychological Review, 93(2), 119.
  • Strine, T. W., Chapman, D. P., Balluz, L. S., Moriarty, D. G., & Mokdad, A. H. (2008). The associations between life satisfaction and health-related quality of life, chronic illness, and health behaviors among US community-dwelling adults. Journal of Community Health, 33(1), 40-50.
  • Tov, W. (2018). Well-being concepts and components. In E. Diener, S. Oishi, and L. Tay (Eds.), Handbook of subjective well-being (pp. 1-15). Salt Lake City, UT: Noba Scholar.
  • Trost, J. (2010). The social institution of marriage. Journal of Comparative Family Studies, 41(4), 507-514.
  • Vadakumchery, J. (1994) Suicides: A study about the victims of unsuccessful attempts in Kerala state. [Unpublished manuscript].

Abstract Views: 289

PDF Views: 0




  • Relationship Intimacy and Life Satisfaction among Married Men and Women of Kerala

Abstract Views: 289  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Aishwarya Sanilkumar
Christ College Autonomous, Irinjalakuda, Kerala, India
N.P.M. Hasmina Fathima
Christ College Autonomous, Irinjalakuda, Kerala, India

Abstract


The redefinition of health over time has given immense importance to the overall well-being of a person beyond the physical wellness and lack of diseases or infirmity. Life satisfaction being a cognitive component of well-being is a widely studied concept as it is related to the health of people. With the growth of the biopsychosocial model of health, social and psychological factors have become equally important in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of illnesses. Social relationships are one of the major social determinants which influences the life of a person and thereby the present study tries to relate the factors of life satisfaction and relationship intimacy. A gender perspective within the embedded social grounds were given significance to comprehend the results better. The study was conducted on a sample of 28 married men and 59 married women of Kerala. The tools used for the statistical study were the PAIR intimacy scale Schaefer and Olson (1981) and the Satisfaction with life scale (Diener, 1985). Correlations, Regressions and t-tests were conducted to reach the significant conclusions. The study concluded that there is no significant difference in the Relationship intimacy and Life satisfaction of married men and women, while the correlation between these variables are significantly positive. It is also revealed that this correlation is significant only in the case of married men and not in the case of married women of Kerala. It is concluded through the results that relationship intimacy predicts life satisfaction among married men. Limitation and future possibilities of the study have also been discussed in the paper.


Keywords


Gender Perspective, Life satisfaction, Marriage, Relationship Intimacy.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.15614/ijpp%2F2022%2Fv13i3%2F218210