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Progress of Self-Help Groups – Bank linkage programme in India between 2000 and 2019


Affiliations
1 Pedagogical Research Associate (PRA), Indian Institute of Management, Bangalore, India
 

The main purpose of Self-Help Groups (SHGs) is to create a business activity that generates regular income and to raise the standard of living of weakest section of the society. It is vital that SHGs are linked with a business activity which is in favor of the region in which SHGs are established. Women are an integral part of nation building. Indian women contribute their entire earnings for meeting the requirements of their family. This is a sure measure towards eradicating poverty. There are tremendous efforts made by members of Self – Help Groups - Bank Linkage Programme to increase their savings and invest funds which will reap benefits for them.

The savings are pooled together and are put in investment activities. These investments made by SHGs are essential for capital formation and economic growth in a developing country, like India. The analysis is done on loan disbursed, savings and nonperforming assets with the help of basic statistical measures. Through the provision of microfinance by banks to Self – Help Groups- Bank Linkage Programme numerous people have come under financial inclusion which every government and banking system works for.


Keywords

Self Help Groups, Self – Help Groups - Bank Linkage Programme, Non – Performing Assets, Savings, Bank Outstanding.
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  • Progress of Self-Help Groups – Bank linkage programme in India between 2000 and 2019

Abstract Views: 152  |  PDF Views: 63

Authors

Meena R.
Pedagogical Research Associate (PRA), Indian Institute of Management, Bangalore, India

Abstract


The main purpose of Self-Help Groups (SHGs) is to create a business activity that generates regular income and to raise the standard of living of weakest section of the society. It is vital that SHGs are linked with a business activity which is in favor of the region in which SHGs are established. Women are an integral part of nation building. Indian women contribute their entire earnings for meeting the requirements of their family. This is a sure measure towards eradicating poverty. There are tremendous efforts made by members of Self – Help Groups - Bank Linkage Programme to increase their savings and invest funds which will reap benefits for them.

The savings are pooled together and are put in investment activities. These investments made by SHGs are essential for capital formation and economic growth in a developing country, like India. The analysis is done on loan disbursed, savings and nonperforming assets with the help of basic statistical measures. Through the provision of microfinance by banks to Self – Help Groups- Bank Linkage Programme numerous people have come under financial inclusion which every government and banking system works for.


Keywords


Self Help Groups, Self – Help Groups - Bank Linkage Programme, Non – Performing Assets, Savings, Bank Outstanding.

References