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Major Issues and Challenges of Women Entrepreneurship in India - A Literature Review


Affiliations
1 Assistant Professor, K.L.E. Society’s Institute of Management Studies and Research, BVB Campus, Vidyanagar, Hubli & Research Scholar, Kousali Institute of Management Studies, Karnatak University, Dharwad, Karnataka, India
2 Professor and Research Guide, Kousali Institute of Management Studies, Karnatak University, Dharwad, Karnataka, India
     

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There has certainly been a drastic evolution in the meadow of economy in the contemporaneous globalized era of today. In developing countries as the escalating stars of the economies have decided to essentially bring fortune and safety of women entrepreneurs which have been considered and nominated as innovative devices for overall development. For overall optimization significant economic and social living index has manifold women entrepreneurial activity thus enhances a progress for the overall rights of women. As such women entrepreneurship is also synonymous along with women empowerment. Parallel to male counterpart’s female entrepreneurs are quite catalytic with respect to innovation, creation of jobs and also provide more than tangible contribution to gross national product of the nation. For entrepreneurship to flourish and excel innovation works as a catalyst. Women entrepreneurs have just recently emerged, giving them an endangered viewpoint in the world of business, but their involvement in entrepreneurial activity is still severely limited. Leaders especially women are always assertive, readily apt to take uneven risks and persuasive in nature and have managed themselves to survive and succeed in this cut throat competition with hard work, diligence and perseverance. Indian women entrepreneurs are known for their ability to learn rapidly, be persuasive, have an open problem-solving attitude, be ready to take risks and chances, be able to encourage others, and know how to win and lose graciously. Due to Liberalization, Privatization, and Globalization, the world is changing at a breakneck speed, presenting new opportunities and major difficulties for women. For tracing the rise of women entrepreneurs in India, sex disaggregated databases on women entrepreneurship produced by the Government of India and other such worldwide publications are primarily analysed. The rising continuous presence of women in the business field has significantly altered the demographic features of business and economic growth in the country. comAs a result of the synthesis of a thorough examination of literature, a diverse profile of women entrepreneurs in India has emerged. Women entrepreneurs are a diverse collection of people that come from various age groups and demographic origins. Throughout the process of establishing and operating their businesses, people face a variety of gender-specific and gender-neutral obstacles. Women’s entrepreneurial activity is centred in Kerala, Tamilnadu, West Bengal, Andhra Pradesh, and Maharashtra, according to the research. As a result, there is an immediate need to understand policy imperatives and substantial initiatives that might help India’s women entrepreneurs thrive in a perilous climate.

Keywords

Demography, Economic growth, Entrepreneurial activities, Women entrepreneurship.
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  • Major Issues and Challenges of Women Entrepreneurship in India - A Literature Review

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Authors

Jayadatta S.
Assistant Professor, K.L.E. Society’s Institute of Management Studies and Research, BVB Campus, Vidyanagar, Hubli & Research Scholar, Kousali Institute of Management Studies, Karnatak University, Dharwad, Karnataka, India
Shivappa
Professor and Research Guide, Kousali Institute of Management Studies, Karnatak University, Dharwad, Karnataka, India

Abstract


There has certainly been a drastic evolution in the meadow of economy in the contemporaneous globalized era of today. In developing countries as the escalating stars of the economies have decided to essentially bring fortune and safety of women entrepreneurs which have been considered and nominated as innovative devices for overall development. For overall optimization significant economic and social living index has manifold women entrepreneurial activity thus enhances a progress for the overall rights of women. As such women entrepreneurship is also synonymous along with women empowerment. Parallel to male counterpart’s female entrepreneurs are quite catalytic with respect to innovation, creation of jobs and also provide more than tangible contribution to gross national product of the nation. For entrepreneurship to flourish and excel innovation works as a catalyst. Women entrepreneurs have just recently emerged, giving them an endangered viewpoint in the world of business, but their involvement in entrepreneurial activity is still severely limited. Leaders especially women are always assertive, readily apt to take uneven risks and persuasive in nature and have managed themselves to survive and succeed in this cut throat competition with hard work, diligence and perseverance. Indian women entrepreneurs are known for their ability to learn rapidly, be persuasive, have an open problem-solving attitude, be ready to take risks and chances, be able to encourage others, and know how to win and lose graciously. Due to Liberalization, Privatization, and Globalization, the world is changing at a breakneck speed, presenting new opportunities and major difficulties for women. For tracing the rise of women entrepreneurs in India, sex disaggregated databases on women entrepreneurship produced by the Government of India and other such worldwide publications are primarily analysed. The rising continuous presence of women in the business field has significantly altered the demographic features of business and economic growth in the country. comAs a result of the synthesis of a thorough examination of literature, a diverse profile of women entrepreneurs in India has emerged. Women entrepreneurs are a diverse collection of people that come from various age groups and demographic origins. Throughout the process of establishing and operating their businesses, people face a variety of gender-specific and gender-neutral obstacles. Women’s entrepreneurial activity is centred in Kerala, Tamilnadu, West Bengal, Andhra Pradesh, and Maharashtra, according to the research. As a result, there is an immediate need to understand policy imperatives and substantial initiatives that might help India’s women entrepreneurs thrive in a perilous climate.

Keywords


Demography, Economic growth, Entrepreneurial activities, Women entrepreneurship.

References