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Influence of On-Farm Liquid Organic Manures on Soil Health and Crop Production


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1 Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, College of Agriculture, Vellayani, Thiruvananthapuram (Kerala), India
     

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A study on “Influence of on-farm liquid organic manures on soil health and crop production” was undertaken at the College of Agriculture, Vellayani during 2014-2017. The experiment was to evaluate the efficacy of soil and foliar applications of on-farm liquid organic manures on soil health and crop nutrition using Okra as a test crop. The treatments included were 75 per cent N as enriched vermicompost along with diluted liquid organic manures separately as soil and foliar applications. The post-harvest analysis of soil revealed that pH, EC, organic carbon and labile carbon contents varied significantly among the treatments. The highest organic carbon content of the soil was recorded by T4 and T12. The maximum labile carbon was recorded by T8. T5 was rich in available N. T5 registered the highest plant uptake of major nutrients. The treatment T3 registered the highest plant uptake of secondary nutrients. The highest value of Fe and Zn uptake was noticed in T11. The highest value of Cu uptake was noticed in T1. The highest value of Mn uptake was noticed in T3. The lowest plant uptake of all nutrients was recorded by T13 (Absolute control). Economics of cultivation of okra indicated that the cost-benefit ratio was found higher for treatment T5, 75 per cent N as EVC + Panchagavya 3 per cent foliar application (2.83) followed by T7,75 per cent N as EVC + cow urine 10 per cent foliar spray (2.09).

Keywords

Okra, Benefit-Cost Ratio, Enriched Vermicompost, Liquid Organic Manures, Growth, Yield Attributes, Nutrient Uptake, Soil Health.
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  • Influence of On-Farm Liquid Organic Manures on Soil Health and Crop Production

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Authors

Sreya U. Parvathi
Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, College of Agriculture, Vellayani, Thiruvananthapuram (Kerala), India
K. Ushakumari
Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, College of Agriculture, Vellayani, Thiruvananthapuram (Kerala), India

Abstract


A study on “Influence of on-farm liquid organic manures on soil health and crop production” was undertaken at the College of Agriculture, Vellayani during 2014-2017. The experiment was to evaluate the efficacy of soil and foliar applications of on-farm liquid organic manures on soil health and crop nutrition using Okra as a test crop. The treatments included were 75 per cent N as enriched vermicompost along with diluted liquid organic manures separately as soil and foliar applications. The post-harvest analysis of soil revealed that pH, EC, organic carbon and labile carbon contents varied significantly among the treatments. The highest organic carbon content of the soil was recorded by T4 and T12. The maximum labile carbon was recorded by T8. T5 was rich in available N. T5 registered the highest plant uptake of major nutrients. The treatment T3 registered the highest plant uptake of secondary nutrients. The highest value of Fe and Zn uptake was noticed in T11. The highest value of Cu uptake was noticed in T1. The highest value of Mn uptake was noticed in T3. The lowest plant uptake of all nutrients was recorded by T13 (Absolute control). Economics of cultivation of okra indicated that the cost-benefit ratio was found higher for treatment T5, 75 per cent N as EVC + Panchagavya 3 per cent foliar application (2.83) followed by T7,75 per cent N as EVC + cow urine 10 per cent foliar spray (2.09).

Keywords


Okra, Benefit-Cost Ratio, Enriched Vermicompost, Liquid Organic Manures, Growth, Yield Attributes, Nutrient Uptake, Soil Health.

References