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Epigenetic Changes in Eusocial Insects which affect Age and Longevity


Affiliations
1 Faculty of Sciences, Department of Biology and Ecology, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovića 3, Serbia
 

Ageing is a complex process common to all living orga-nisms, influenced by different environmental and genetic factors which are difficult to understand. Epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation, histone post-translational modification and non-coding RNA affect ageing. Eusocial insects provide an ideal platform for analysing the impact of epigenetic changes on ageing due to their phenotypic plasticity. This study summa-rizes most of the data published so far on epigenetic changes during ageing in eusocial insects.

Keywords

DNA Methylation, Histone Modification, In-vertebrates, Non-coding RNA
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  • Epigenetic Changes in Eusocial Insects which affect Age and Longevity

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Authors

Srđana Đorđievski
Faculty of Sciences, Department of Biology and Ecology, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovića 3, Serbia
Tatjana V. Celic
Faculty of Sciences, Department of Biology and Ecology, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovića 3, Serbia
Elvira L. Vukasinovic
Faculty of Sciences, Department of Biology and Ecology, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovića 3, Serbia
Danijela Kojic
Faculty of Sciences, Department of Biology and Ecology, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovića 3, Serbia
Jelena Purac
Faculty of Sciences, Department of Biology and Ecology, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovića 3, Serbia

Abstract


Ageing is a complex process common to all living orga-nisms, influenced by different environmental and genetic factors which are difficult to understand. Epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation, histone post-translational modification and non-coding RNA affect ageing. Eusocial insects provide an ideal platform for analysing the impact of epigenetic changes on ageing due to their phenotypic plasticity. This study summa-rizes most of the data published so far on epigenetic changes during ageing in eusocial insects.

Keywords


DNA Methylation, Histone Modification, In-vertebrates, Non-coding RNA

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.18520/cs%2Fv123%2Fi2%2F154-159