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Role of Nutrition in Stress Management: An Interesting Correlation


Affiliations
1 Department of Nutrition, Asansol Girls’ College, Paschim Bardhaman, West Bengal, India
2 Department of Allied Health Sciences, Midnapore City College, Paschim Medinipur, West Bengal, India
3 Department of Physiology, Midnapore College, Midnapore, Paschim Medinipur, West Bengal, India
     

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Stress has become an integral part of our daily life in different forms. Stress arises from numerous sources and mostly has negative effects on multiple systems the human body and causes various adverse health effects. Depression, anxiety and irritability are psychological issues, whereas migraine, ache in different muscles, diabetes, cardiovascular disorders, respiratory problems, reproductive dysfunctions, etc., are physiological attributes. Several foods contain various nutrients that can help in reducing stress. Various nutritional elements, including anti-oxidants, anti-inflammatory agents, neuro-endocrine protective components have combating effects. The combined effects of the substances are involved in stress management. Necessary nutritional inputs to the body in stress condition are cost effective, easy to adopt, and beneficial in various ways. An interesting relationship between stress and nutrition has been discussed in this article.

Keywords

Stress, Health, Mood, Diseases, Nutrition, Antioxidants.
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  • Role of Nutrition in Stress Management: An Interesting Correlation

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Authors

Pallavi Majumder
Department of Nutrition, Asansol Girls’ College, Paschim Bardhaman, West Bengal, India
Dilip Kumar Nandi
Department of Allied Health Sciences, Midnapore City College, Paschim Medinipur, West Bengal, India
Saptadip Samanta
Department of Physiology, Midnapore College, Midnapore, Paschim Medinipur, West Bengal, India

Abstract


Stress has become an integral part of our daily life in different forms. Stress arises from numerous sources and mostly has negative effects on multiple systems the human body and causes various adverse health effects. Depression, anxiety and irritability are psychological issues, whereas migraine, ache in different muscles, diabetes, cardiovascular disorders, respiratory problems, reproductive dysfunctions, etc., are physiological attributes. Several foods contain various nutrients that can help in reducing stress. Various nutritional elements, including anti-oxidants, anti-inflammatory agents, neuro-endocrine protective components have combating effects. The combined effects of the substances are involved in stress management. Necessary nutritional inputs to the body in stress condition are cost effective, easy to adopt, and beneficial in various ways. An interesting relationship between stress and nutrition has been discussed in this article.

Keywords


Stress, Health, Mood, Diseases, Nutrition, Antioxidants.

References