Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access
Open Access Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Restricted Access Subscription Access

A Qualitative Assessment of Butterfly Fauna (Insecta: Lepidoptera) of East Kolkata, West Bengal and a Note on their Conservation Aspect


Affiliations
1 Department of Zoology, Charuchandra College, 22-Lake Road, Kolkata 700 029, West Bengal, India
     

   Subscribe/Renew Journal


Urban morphology of Kolkata has been changed considerably in last three to four decades. This change is more vivid in newly developed zones like East Kolkata and New Town areas. The town planning, buildings and land use tremendously altered the basic characters of the land, water bodies and vegetation. Consequently, the flora and fauna of the area have been adversely affected. In this background an assessment of the richness of the butterfly fauna was undertaken by periodical surveys for 13 months during 2021-2022. Altogether fifty species belonging to five families were recorded and that indicated no major biodiversity loss from a dataset of about twenty five years back. Some species of earlier study were unnoticed, indicating partial loss of habitat condition. As the butterflies are good environmental indicators and benefactors some suggestions are made for their better survival and conservation.

Keywords

Kolkata Metropolitan Area, Urbanisation, Habitat Change, Butterfly, Faunal Status, Conservation Need.
Subscription Login to verify subscription
User
Notifications
Font Size


  • Bengtsson, J., Nilsson, S. G., Franc, A. and Menozzi, P. 2000. Biodiversity, disturbances, ecosystem function and management of European forests. For. Ecol. Manag., 132: 39-50.
  • Bhattacharya, D. P. 1997. Insecta: Satyridae. Fauna of West Bengal, State Fauna Series, 3(7): 729-753. Zool. Surv. India.
  • Blair, R. B. 1999. Birds and butterflies along an urban gradient: surrogate taxa for assessing biodiversity. Ecol. Applic., 9: 164-170. https://doi.org/10.1890/1051-0761(1999)009[0164:BABAAU]2.0.CO; 2.
  • Bonebrake, T. C., Ponisio, L. C., Boggs, C. L. and Ehrlich. P. R. 2010. More than just indicators: a review of tropical butterfly ecology and conservation. Biol. Conserv., 143: 1831-1841.
  • Fred, M. S. and Brommer, J. E. 2003. Influence of habitat quality and patch size on occupancy and persistence in two populations of the Apollo Butterfly (Parnassius apollo). J. Insect Conserv., 7: 85-98.
  • D’Souza, J. M., Mayikho, R. and D’Silva, P. 2016. Butterfly diversity and their host nectar plants of Permuda village in Dakshina Kannada. Proceedings Lake, 2016, pp. 391-397.
  • Gaonkar, H. 1996. Butterflies of Western Ghats with notes on those of Sri Lanka. A Report to the Center of Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, Zoological Museum, Copenhagen and Natural History Museum, London. 89.
  • Ghosh, S. K. and Choudhury, M. 1997. Insecta: Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae. Fauna of West Bengal, State Fauna Series, 3(7): 275-318. Zool. Surv. India.
  • Ghosh, S. and Siddique, S. 2005. Butterfly diversity in and around urban Kolkata. Rec. zool. Surv. India, 104(3-4): 111-119.
  • Gupta, I. J. 1997. Insecta: Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae. Fauna of West Bengal, State Fauna Series, 3(7): 429-489. Zool. Surv. India.
  • Losey, J. E. and Vaughan, M. 2006. The economic value of ecological services provided by insects. BioScience, 56: 311e323.
  • Mathew, G. and Anto, M. 2007. In situ conservation of butterflies through establishment of butterfly gardens: a case study at Peechi, Kerala, India. Curr. Sci., 93: 337-347.
  • Mukherjee, S., Banerjee, S., Saha, G. K., Basu, P. and Aditya, G. 2015. Butterfly diversity in Kolkata, India: an appraisal for conservation management. J. Asia-Pac. Biodivers., 8(3): 210-221.
  • Nair, A. V., Mitra, P. and Bandyopadhyay, S. A. 2014. Studies on the diversity and abundance of butterfly (Lepidoptera: Rhopalocera) fauna in and around Sarojini Naidu College campus, Kolkata, West Bengal, India. J. Entomol. Zool. Stud., 2(4): 129-134.
  • Nimbalkar, R. K., Chandekar, S. K. and Khunte, S. P. 2011. Butterfly diversity in relation to nectar food plants from Bhor Tahsil, Pune District, Maharashtra, India. J. Threat. Taxa, 3: 1601-1609.
  • Pollard, E. and Yates, T. J. 1993. Monitoring Butterflies for Ecology and Conservation. Springer Dodrecht Publ., UK; xiv + 274 pp.
  • Pywell, R. F., Warman, E. A., Sparks, T. H., Greatorex-Davies, J. N., Walker, K. J. et al. 2004. Assessing habitat quality for butterflies on intensively managed arable farmland. Biol. Conserv., 118: 313-325.
  • Radchuk, V., Turlure, C., Schtickzelle, N. 2013. Each life stage matters: the importance of assessing the response to climate change over the complete life cycle in butterflies. J. Anim. Ecol., 82(1): 275-285. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02029.x.
  • Schtickzelle, N. and Baguette, M. 2003. Behavioural responses to habitat patch boundaries restrict dispersal and generate emigration-patch area relationships in fragmented landscapes. J. Anim. Ecol., 72: 533-545.
  • Thomas, C. D. and Harrison, S. 1992. Spatial dynamics of a patchily distributed butterfly species. J. Anim. Ecol., 61: 437-446.
  • Thomas, J. A. 2005. Monitoring change in the abundance and distribution of insects using butterflies and other indicator groups. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 360: 339-357.
  • Tiple, A. D. 2012. Butterfly species diversity, relative abundance and status in Tropical Forest Research Institute, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, Central India. J. Threat. Taxa, 4(7): 2713-2717.

Abstract Views: 102

PDF Views: 0




  • A Qualitative Assessment of Butterfly Fauna (Insecta: Lepidoptera) of East Kolkata, West Bengal and a Note on their Conservation Aspect

Abstract Views: 102  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Tapasi Roy
Department of Zoology, Charuchandra College, 22-Lake Road, Kolkata 700 029, West Bengal, India
Kausiki Chakrabarti
Department of Zoology, Charuchandra College, 22-Lake Road, Kolkata 700 029, West Bengal, India

Abstract


Urban morphology of Kolkata has been changed considerably in last three to four decades. This change is more vivid in newly developed zones like East Kolkata and New Town areas. The town planning, buildings and land use tremendously altered the basic characters of the land, water bodies and vegetation. Consequently, the flora and fauna of the area have been adversely affected. In this background an assessment of the richness of the butterfly fauna was undertaken by periodical surveys for 13 months during 2021-2022. Altogether fifty species belonging to five families were recorded and that indicated no major biodiversity loss from a dataset of about twenty five years back. Some species of earlier study were unnoticed, indicating partial loss of habitat condition. As the butterflies are good environmental indicators and benefactors some suggestions are made for their better survival and conservation.

Keywords


Kolkata Metropolitan Area, Urbanisation, Habitat Change, Butterfly, Faunal Status, Conservation Need.

References