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Perspective:When Data are Ranks-Analysis of Rank Data


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1 Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India
     

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In many real life situations respondents are asked to rank order a set of items based on their preferences. This can happen in selection interviews where a set of candidates have to be rank ordered (say, from best to worst) regarding their suitability for a job or position or in boardroom discussions where different alternative investment proposals have to be ranked based on their risk-reward profiles. In many market research studies respondents are asked to rank order a set of items with respect to their possibility of buying them. Thus rank data occur quite commonly in our daily life.
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  • Kemeny, J. G., & Snell, L. J. (1962). Preference ranking: An axiomatic approach, in mathematical models in the social sciences. Ginn., New York, 9-23.
  • Laha, A. K., & Dongaonkar, S. (2012). Bayesian analysis of rank data using SIR. In SenGupta, A. editor, Advances in Multivariate Statistical Methods, chapter 19, pp. 327-335. World Scientific.
  • Laha, A., Dutta, S., & Roy, V. (2017). A novel sandwich algorithm for empirical Bayes analysis of rank data. Statistics and Its Interface, 10(4), 543-556.
  • Mallows, C. L. (1957). Non-null ranking models. I. Biometrika, 44(1/2), 114-130.

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  • Perspective:When Data are Ranks-Analysis of Rank Data

Abstract Views: 215  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Arnab Kumar Laha
Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India

Abstract


In many real life situations respondents are asked to rank order a set of items based on their preferences. This can happen in selection interviews where a set of candidates have to be rank ordered (say, from best to worst) regarding their suitability for a job or position or in boardroom discussions where different alternative investment proposals have to be ranked based on their risk-reward profiles. In many market research studies respondents are asked to rank order a set of items with respect to their possibility of buying them. Thus rank data occur quite commonly in our daily life.

References