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"Jill of All Trades, Master of None?" Exploring Multiple Role Conflict Among Women Working from Home During Covid-19


Affiliations
1 Department of Psychology, CHRIST (Deemed to be University), Bangalore, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Psychology, CHRIST (Deemed to be University), Bangalore, Karnataka, India
     

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During a disease outbreak, it is well known that marginalized groups, such as women, are affected the most. This is no different for the COVID-19 pandemic. In India especially, women engage more in household and childcare responsibilities than men and working women are currently experiencing a greater burden as they are required to work from home and manage these different roles at once, leading to multiple role conflict (MRC). The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the experience of multiple role conflicts among women working from home in joint and nuclear families during the COVID-19 pandemic in urban India. Semi-structured interviews were conducted on six women working from home in joint families and four from nuclear families. Thematic analysis was used and the themes were compared between both family structures. Participants from both family structures were found to share similar psychological consequences as a result of the role conflict. But, women from nuclear families reported a lack of moral support contrary to joint families. This study sheds light on the need for the provision of education, facilities and supports particularly by family development planners, therapists and organizations to aid women working from home in the pandemic.

Keywords

multiple role conflict, COVID-19, working women, work from home, family structures.
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  • "Jill of All Trades, Master of None?" Exploring Multiple Role Conflict Among Women Working from Home During Covid-19

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Authors

Sai Chandana Mukkamala
Department of Psychology, CHRIST (Deemed to be University), Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Daryanani Riddhi Navin
Department of Psychology, CHRIST (Deemed to be University), Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Priyansha Gupta
Department of Psychology, CHRIST (Deemed to be University), Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Akriti Srivastava
Department of Psychology, CHRIST (Deemed to be University), Bangalore, Karnataka, India

Abstract


During a disease outbreak, it is well known that marginalized groups, such as women, are affected the most. This is no different for the COVID-19 pandemic. In India especially, women engage more in household and childcare responsibilities than men and working women are currently experiencing a greater burden as they are required to work from home and manage these different roles at once, leading to multiple role conflict (MRC). The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the experience of multiple role conflicts among women working from home in joint and nuclear families during the COVID-19 pandemic in urban India. Semi-structured interviews were conducted on six women working from home in joint families and four from nuclear families. Thematic analysis was used and the themes were compared between both family structures. Participants from both family structures were found to share similar psychological consequences as a result of the role conflict. But, women from nuclear families reported a lack of moral support contrary to joint families. This study sheds light on the need for the provision of education, facilities and supports particularly by family development planners, therapists and organizations to aid women working from home in the pandemic.

Keywords


multiple role conflict, COVID-19, working women, work from home, family structures.

References