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Impact of Postpartum Depression and Family Environment Across Mothers


Affiliations
1 Research Scholar, Department of Psychology Chhatrapati Shahuji Maharaj, University, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Associate Professor, Department of Psychology P. P. N., College, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India
     

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Women are an integral part of National development. Over the past decades, women have shown integrity and ability in all fields. Their contributions are recognizable and commendable but Indian women still face many difficulties in life. These difficulties sometimes trigger many psychosocial problems, such as anxiety, tension, frustration, emotional upsets, mental disturbance, and depression. Postpartum depression occurs after childbirth or after birth. This type of depression is also clinically evident. This study attempted to define postpartum depression and its signs, causes and contributing risk elements. Depression after pregnancy or birth is called postpartum depression. This is a type of clinical depression. This study attempted to define postpartum depression, symptom causes, factors, and risk factors. This study aimed to identify postpartum depression in mothers after the birth of children across the family environment. The sample of the present study consists of 200 mothers (100 mothers after delivery of 1st child & 100 mothers after delivery of 2nd child within one month of delivery). The age range of the participants was 30-35 years. Samples were collected from nearby areas of Varanasi. The Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS, Edinburgh, 1984) and Family Environment Scale (Joshi & Vyas, 1997) were used as tools. The results reveal that there is a significant difference between mothers across the delivery of the first and second child and the level of postpartum depression in the overall Family Environment.

Keywords

postpartum depression, family environment, children's mother.
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  • Impact of Postpartum Depression and Family Environment Across Mothers

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Authors

Alka Srivastava
Research Scholar, Department of Psychology Chhatrapati Shahuji Maharaj, University, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India
Dr. Abha Singh
Associate Professor, Department of Psychology P. P. N., College, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India

Abstract


Women are an integral part of National development. Over the past decades, women have shown integrity and ability in all fields. Their contributions are recognizable and commendable but Indian women still face many difficulties in life. These difficulties sometimes trigger many psychosocial problems, such as anxiety, tension, frustration, emotional upsets, mental disturbance, and depression. Postpartum depression occurs after childbirth or after birth. This type of depression is also clinically evident. This study attempted to define postpartum depression and its signs, causes and contributing risk elements. Depression after pregnancy or birth is called postpartum depression. This is a type of clinical depression. This study attempted to define postpartum depression, symptom causes, factors, and risk factors. This study aimed to identify postpartum depression in mothers after the birth of children across the family environment. The sample of the present study consists of 200 mothers (100 mothers after delivery of 1st child & 100 mothers after delivery of 2nd child within one month of delivery). The age range of the participants was 30-35 years. Samples were collected from nearby areas of Varanasi. The Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS, Edinburgh, 1984) and Family Environment Scale (Joshi & Vyas, 1997) were used as tools. The results reveal that there is a significant difference between mothers across the delivery of the first and second child and the level of postpartum depression in the overall Family Environment.

Keywords


postpartum depression, family environment, children's mother.

References