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Influence of Perceived Social Support on Binge Watching And Feelings Associated with It among Young Adults


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1 Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Gargi College, Delhi, University, Delhi, India
     

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Binge watching is a phenomenon that is extremely popular these days. The focus of this research is to examine the impact of Perceived Social Support (PSS) on binge watching and the associated feelings among young adults. The sample used for the study consisted of 90 young adults (45 men & 45 women) aged between 18-35 years living in India. The shorter version of Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL) was applied to evaluate the level of PSS (Cohen & Hoberman, 1983). A structured questionnaire was formed to assess binge watching habits and feelings. The data was analysed using t-test and Pearson correlation. Frequencies were also found to assess the feeling aspect under different conditions. The major findings are as follows: (a) non-binge watchers have a higher perceived social support than binge watchers except for the dimension appraisal support; (b) perceived social support has a moderately negative but significant correlation with binge watching but the dimension appraisal support has a low negative but significant correlation with binge watching (c) binge watching has positive feelings associated with it and the predominant feeling was of relaxation.

Keywords

binge watching, perceived social support.
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  • Influence of Perceived Social Support on Binge Watching And Feelings Associated with It among Young Adults

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Authors

Dr. Poonam Phogat
Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Gargi College, Delhi, University, Delhi, India

Abstract


Binge watching is a phenomenon that is extremely popular these days. The focus of this research is to examine the impact of Perceived Social Support (PSS) on binge watching and the associated feelings among young adults. The sample used for the study consisted of 90 young adults (45 men & 45 women) aged between 18-35 years living in India. The shorter version of Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL) was applied to evaluate the level of PSS (Cohen & Hoberman, 1983). A structured questionnaire was formed to assess binge watching habits and feelings. The data was analysed using t-test and Pearson correlation. Frequencies were also found to assess the feeling aspect under different conditions. The major findings are as follows: (a) non-binge watchers have a higher perceived social support than binge watchers except for the dimension appraisal support; (b) perceived social support has a moderately negative but significant correlation with binge watching but the dimension appraisal support has a low negative but significant correlation with binge watching (c) binge watching has positive feelings associated with it and the predominant feeling was of relaxation.

Keywords


binge watching, perceived social support.

References