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A Pilot Study of Therapeutic Effects of Indian Classical Raga on Depression, Anxiety and Stress among Adults


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1 Department of Psychology, University of Rajasthan Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
     

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Indian classical music is emerging as a therapeutic agent in mental health and well-being. This pilot study aims to see the therapeutic effect of Indian classical raga on depression, anxiety and stress among adults. For the study, 20 participants were randomly selected then participants were divided into two groups; the intervention group and the control group. The intervention group received raga Ahir Bhairav with standard care and the control group received only standard care. Standard care includes pharmacology and psychiatrists counselling. To measure depression, anxiety and stress DASS-42 was used at baseline and after treatment. Results stated that there is a significant decrease in depression, anxiety and stress following raga therapy. Thus the raga is an inexpensive, non-invasive, safe adjunct to reduce stress, anxiety and depression.


Keywords

Raga Ahir Bhairav, Indian Classical Music, Depression, Anxiety, Stress.
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  • A Pilot Study of Therapeutic Effects of Indian Classical Raga on Depression, Anxiety and Stress among Adults

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Authors

Sushila Pareek
Department of Psychology, University of Rajasthan Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
Divya Shekhawat
Department of Psychology, University of Rajasthan Jaipur, Rajasthan, India

Abstract


Indian classical music is emerging as a therapeutic agent in mental health and well-being. This pilot study aims to see the therapeutic effect of Indian classical raga on depression, anxiety and stress among adults. For the study, 20 participants were randomly selected then participants were divided into two groups; the intervention group and the control group. The intervention group received raga Ahir Bhairav with standard care and the control group received only standard care. Standard care includes pharmacology and psychiatrists counselling. To measure depression, anxiety and stress DASS-42 was used at baseline and after treatment. Results stated that there is a significant decrease in depression, anxiety and stress following raga therapy. Thus the raga is an inexpensive, non-invasive, safe adjunct to reduce stress, anxiety and depression.


Keywords


Raga Ahir Bhairav, Indian Classical Music, Depression, Anxiety, Stress.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.15614/ijpp%2F2022%2Fv13i3%2F218202