Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access
Open Access Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Restricted Access Subscription Access

Effects of Positive Metacognitions and Positive Meta-emotions on Perceived Stress in Adolescents


Affiliations
1 Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi Kashi Vidyapith, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India
     

   Subscribe/Renew Journal


The present study was conducted to elucidate the effects of positive metacognitions and positive meta-emotions on perceived stress in adolescents. The sample consisted of 300 adolescents (150 boys & 150 girls) studying in Standard X and XII in schools of Varanasi city and preparing for competitive examinations. The participants were individually administered Hindi version of Positive Metacognitions and Meta-emotions Questionnaire and Perceived Stress Scale. The participants scoring below and up to 25th percentile and scoring above 75th percentile on the facets of positive metacognitions and positive meta-emotions were respectively designated as low and high scorer participants (boys & girls) were screed out. The effects of levels (low & high) of facets of positive metacognitions and positive meta-emotions on measures of perceived stress (uncontrollable perceived stress & controllable perceived stress) were analysed by applying 2 × 2 ANOVA (2 genders × 2 levels of facets of positive metacognitions and positive meta-emotions). Results revealed significant main effects of gender on uncontrollable perceived stress with respect to PMCEQ-H1 facet of positive metacognitions and positive meta-emotions and significant main effects of levels of PMCEQ-H3 and PMCEQ-H Total facets of positive metacognitions and positive meat-emotions on uncontrollable perceived stress and significant main effects of levels of PMCEQ-H1, PMCEQ-H2 and PMCEQ-H Total on controllable perceived stress. Boys as compared to girls exhibited enhanced uncontrolled perceived stress with respect to PMCEQ-H1. High scorer than low scorer participants on facets of PMCEQ-H displayed significantly lower levels of uncontrollable perceived stress and controllable perceived stress. The findings indicated that high levels of positive metacognitions and positive meta-emotions caused reduced uncontrollable and controllable perceived stress.


Keywords

Positive Metacognitions And Positive Meta-Emotions, Marital Communication, Perceived Stress.
Subscription Login to verify subscription
User
Notifications
Font Size


  • Bailey, R., & Wells, A. (2013). Does metacognition make a unique contribution to health anxiety when controlling for neuroticism, illness cognition, and somatosensory amplification. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, 27, 327-337. Doi:10.1891/0889- 8391.27.4.327
  • Beer, N., & Moneta, G. B. (2010). Construct and concurrent validity of the positive meta- cognitions and positive meta-emotions questionnaire. Personality and Individual Differences, 49, 977-982. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2010.08.008.
  • Bennett, H., & Wells, A. (2010). Metacognition, memory disorganization and rumination in post-traumatic stress symptoms. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 14, 318- 325. Doi:10.1016/j.janxdis.2010.01.004
  • Bouman, T. K., & Meijer, K. J. (1999). A preliminary study of worry and metacognitions in hypochondriasis. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy: An International Journal of Theory & Practice, 6(2), 96-101.
  • Cohen, S., Kamarack, T., & Mermelstein, R. (1983). A global measure of perceived stress. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 24, 385-396. DOI 10.2307/2136404.
  • Cohen, S., & Williamson, G. M. (1988). Perceived stress in a probability sample in theUnited States. In S. Spacapan and S. Oskamp (Eds.,), The social psychology of health, (pp. 31-67) Newbury Park: CA, Sage.
  • Emmelkamp, P. M. G., & Aardema, A. (1999).Metacognition, specific obsessive-compulsive beliefs and obsessive-compulsive behavior. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, 6(2), 139-145.
  • Flavell, J. H. (1979). Metacognition and cognitive monitoring: A new area of cognitive developmental inquiry. American Psychologist, 34(10), 906.
  • Ha, J., & Hyunn-Ie, A. (2013). Multiple mediator effect of meta-cognition on the relation of perceived stress, anxiety and generalized problematic internet use. The Korean Journal of Counseling and Psychotheraphy, 25, 251-273.
  • Holeva, V., Tarrier, N., & Wells, A. (2001). Prevalence and predictors of acute stress disorder and PTSD following road traffic accidents: Thought control strategies and social support. Behavior Therapy, 32(1), 65-83.
  • Jaiswal, A. K., Singh, L. N., Rani, R., Sarraf, S. R., & Pandey, D. (2017). Standardization and validation of Hindi version of positive metacognitions and meta-emotions questionnaire. Indian Journal of Positive Psychology, 8, 547-553.
  • Jaiswal, A. K., Meshram, S., Pandey, V., & Singh, A. (2021). Standardization and validation of Hindi version of Perceived Stress Scale in Indian sample. Indian
  • Journal of Health and Well-being, 12, 386-390.
  • Kim, Y., & Jun, Y. (2015). Role of positive meta-cognition and negative meta-cognition in employment stress among college students. International Conference on Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences (ICSHSS'15 ) July 29-30, 2015, Phuket (Thailand).
  • Lazarus, R. S., & Folkman, S. (1984). Stress, appraisal, and coping. New York: Springer.
  • Leung, D., Lam, T., & Chan, S. (2010). Three versions of perceived stress scale: Validation in a sample of Chinese cardiac patients who smoke. BMC Public Health, 10, 513.
  • Matthews, G., Hillyard, E. J., & Campbell, S. E. (1999). Metacognition and maladaptive coping as components of test anxiety. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, 6, 111-125.
  • Nelson, T. O., & Narens, L. (1994). Why investigate metacognition? In J. Metcalfe and A. P. Shimamura (Eds.), Metacognition knowing about knowing (pp. 1-25). Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press.
  • Papageorgiou, C., & Wells, A. (2003). An empirical test of a clinical metacognitive model of rumination and depression. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 27, 261-273. doi:10.1023/ A:1023962332399.
  • Park, K. (2010). The moderating effect of meta-cognition and mindfulness on the relation between perceived stress and depression. The Korean Journal of Health Psychology, 15, 617-634.
  • Remor, E. (2006). Psychometric properties of a European Spanish version of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Spanish Journal of Psychology, 9, 86-93.
  • Roussis, P., & Wells, A. (2006). Post-traumatic stress symptoms: Tests of relationships with thought control strategies and beliefs as predicted by the metacognitive model. Personality and Individual Differences, 40(1), 111-122. doi: 10.1016/j.paid.2005.06.019
  • Schunk, D. H., & Ertmer, P. A. (1999). Self-regulatory processes during computer skill acquisition: Goal and self-evaluative influences. Journal of Educational
  • Psychology, 91, 251-260.
  • Spada, M. M., & Wells, A. (2006). Metacognitions about alcohol use in problem drinkers. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy: An International Journal of Theory and Practice, 13(2), 138 -143. https://doi.org/10.1002/cpp.478
  • Spada, M. M., Hiou, K., & Nikcevic, A. V. (2006). Metacognitions, emotions, and procrastination. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, 20, 319-326. Doi:10.1891/jcop.20.3.319
  • Spada, M. M., Nikcevic, A. V., Moneta, G. B., & Wells, A. (2008). Metacognition, perceived stress, and negative emotion. Personality and Individual Differences, 44, 1172-1181. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2007.11.010.
  • Teasdale, J. D. (1999). Meta-cognition, mindfulness and the modification of mood disorders. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, 6, 146-156. (Special Issue, Meta-cognition and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy).
  • Wells, A. (1995). Meta-cognition and worry: A cognitive model of generalized anxiety disorder. Behaviour and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 23, 301-320.
  • Wells, A. (2000a). Emotional disorders and metacognition. Chichester, UK: Wiley.
  • Wells, A. (2000b). Meta-cognitive theory for anxiety and depression. New York: The Guilford Press.
  • Wells, A., & Carter, K. (1999). Preliminary test of a cognitive model of generalized anxiety disorder. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 37, 585-594. Doi:10
  • .1016/S00057967(98)00156-9
  • Wells, A., & Carter, K. (2001). Further tests of a cognitive model of generalized anxiety disorder: Metacognitions and worry in GAD, panic disorder, social phobia, depression, and non-patients. Behavior Therapy, 32, 85-102. Doi:10.1016/S00057 894(01)80045-9
  • Wells, A., & Matthews, G. (1994). Attention and emotion: A clinical perspective. Hove, UK: Erlbaum.
  • Wells, A., & Papageorgiou, C. (1998). Social phobia: Effects of external attention on anxiety, negative beliefs, and perspective taking. Behavior Therapy, 29(3), 357-370. DOI: 10.1016/S0005-7894(98)80037-3.

Abstract Views: 19

PDF Views: 0




  • Effects of Positive Metacognitions and Positive Meta-emotions on Perceived Stress in Adolescents

Abstract Views: 19  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Sakshee Meshram
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi Kashi Vidyapith, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India
Arun Kumar Jaiswal
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi Kashi Vidyapith, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India

Abstract


The present study was conducted to elucidate the effects of positive metacognitions and positive meta-emotions on perceived stress in adolescents. The sample consisted of 300 adolescents (150 boys & 150 girls) studying in Standard X and XII in schools of Varanasi city and preparing for competitive examinations. The participants were individually administered Hindi version of Positive Metacognitions and Meta-emotions Questionnaire and Perceived Stress Scale. The participants scoring below and up to 25th percentile and scoring above 75th percentile on the facets of positive metacognitions and positive meta-emotions were respectively designated as low and high scorer participants (boys & girls) were screed out. The effects of levels (low & high) of facets of positive metacognitions and positive meta-emotions on measures of perceived stress (uncontrollable perceived stress & controllable perceived stress) were analysed by applying 2 × 2 ANOVA (2 genders × 2 levels of facets of positive metacognitions and positive meta-emotions). Results revealed significant main effects of gender on uncontrollable perceived stress with respect to PMCEQ-H1 facet of positive metacognitions and positive meta-emotions and significant main effects of levels of PMCEQ-H3 and PMCEQ-H Total facets of positive metacognitions and positive meat-emotions on uncontrollable perceived stress and significant main effects of levels of PMCEQ-H1, PMCEQ-H2 and PMCEQ-H Total on controllable perceived stress. Boys as compared to girls exhibited enhanced uncontrolled perceived stress with respect to PMCEQ-H1. High scorer than low scorer participants on facets of PMCEQ-H displayed significantly lower levels of uncontrollable perceived stress and controllable perceived stress. The findings indicated that high levels of positive metacognitions and positive meta-emotions caused reduced uncontrollable and controllable perceived stress.


Keywords


Positive Metacognitions And Positive Meta-Emotions, Marital Communication, Perceived Stress.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.15614/ijpp%2F2022%2Fv13i3%2F218208