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The Role of Metacognitive Training on Social Behavior Metacognition and in Severity of Delusion


Affiliations
1 Department of Psychology, K.O. College, Gumla Ranchi University, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India
2 Department of Clinical Psychology, RINPAS, Kanke, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India
     

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Metacognitive Training (MCT) is a manual-based training program that aims to raise awareness of common cognitive biases and highlight negative consequences in the daily functioning of psychotic/deluded patients. The aim and objectives of the study are to find out the role of MCT to see changes in social behaviour, metacognition and reduction in severity of delusion in patients with delusional disorder. This is a prepared hospital based study, i.e., using pre and post-intervention with control group design. Twenty (20) diagnosed cases of delusional disorder were elected from the RINPAS, Kanke, Ranchi in which Ten (10) patients were randomly selected for the adjunctive treatment, i.e., MCT + Pharmacology, and rest of the patients (10) controlled as treatment as usual. Assessments were done at three stages i.e. baseline, post-training (16 sessions), and to follow-up (2 months). Social behaviour measured by Social Behaviour Assessment Inventory (SBAI) similarly, metacognition by Metacognitive Questionnaire (MCQ), and severity of Delusion by PSYRATS-delusion. Statistically, significant changes were seen in scores of the experimental group than the control group in the form of social behavior, i.e., self-related behavior, environmental, task-related and interpersonal behavior., metacognition, i.e., negative beliefs towards worry concern with uncontrolled danger, positive beliefs about worry, controlling thoughts, cognitive self-conscious and low cognitive confidence and, in the current status of severity of delusion, i.e., disruption in life caused by negative beliefs, preoccupation with delusions, amount and intensity of distress, duration of preoccupation & conviction. The role of metacognitive training is more effective along with pharmacotherapy in respect to changes in the current status of social behavior, metacognition and in the severity of delusion in patients with delusional disorder.


Keywords

Metacognitive Training, Social Behavior, Metacognition, Delusion, Delusional Disorder.
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  • The Role of Metacognitive Training on Social Behavior Metacognition and in Severity of Delusion

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Authors

Sanjay Kumar Bhogta
Department of Psychology, K.O. College, Gumla Ranchi University, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India
K. S. Sengar
Department of Clinical Psychology, RINPAS, Kanke, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India

Abstract


Metacognitive Training (MCT) is a manual-based training program that aims to raise awareness of common cognitive biases and highlight negative consequences in the daily functioning of psychotic/deluded patients. The aim and objectives of the study are to find out the role of MCT to see changes in social behaviour, metacognition and reduction in severity of delusion in patients with delusional disorder. This is a prepared hospital based study, i.e., using pre and post-intervention with control group design. Twenty (20) diagnosed cases of delusional disorder were elected from the RINPAS, Kanke, Ranchi in which Ten (10) patients were randomly selected for the adjunctive treatment, i.e., MCT + Pharmacology, and rest of the patients (10) controlled as treatment as usual. Assessments were done at three stages i.e. baseline, post-training (16 sessions), and to follow-up (2 months). Social behaviour measured by Social Behaviour Assessment Inventory (SBAI) similarly, metacognition by Metacognitive Questionnaire (MCQ), and severity of Delusion by PSYRATS-delusion. Statistically, significant changes were seen in scores of the experimental group than the control group in the form of social behavior, i.e., self-related behavior, environmental, task-related and interpersonal behavior., metacognition, i.e., negative beliefs towards worry concern with uncontrolled danger, positive beliefs about worry, controlling thoughts, cognitive self-conscious and low cognitive confidence and, in the current status of severity of delusion, i.e., disruption in life caused by negative beliefs, preoccupation with delusions, amount and intensity of distress, duration of preoccupation & conviction. The role of metacognitive training is more effective along with pharmacotherapy in respect to changes in the current status of social behavior, metacognition and in the severity of delusion in patients with delusional disorder.


Keywords


Metacognitive Training, Social Behavior, Metacognition, Delusion, Delusional Disorder.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.15614/ijpp%2F2022%2Fv13i3%2F218225