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Effect of Mindfulness based Self-management Therapy (MBSMT) on Life Satisfaction among Teachers


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1 Department of Applied Psychology, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar, Haryana, India
     

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Satisfaction in life is the ultimate goal of life. Satisfaction with life relates to positive outcomes of different domains of life like family, health, and job (Brief et al., 1993). In other words, how much the person likes his/her life which he/she is living is life satisfaction (Veenhoven, 1996). The present study explored the effect of mindfulness-based self-management therapy on life satisfaction among teachers. For the purpose of the study, thirty participants were selected on the basis of their low scores on the life satisfaction scale. Then nine weeks intervention was given to participants. The intervention programme of the MBSMT consists of four modules. In the first step awareness and acceptance skills were taught, the second step was about belief management, the third aspect of the intervention was related to the assessment of strengths and the last step was inculcating positive emotions. After the completion of the intervention the score on the life satisfaction variable was noted down. And analysis was made for the pre and post- assessment with the help of paired t-test, it has been observed that there is a significant difference in the mean score on the variable of life satisfaction among the participants. Further findings highlight the significant effect of mindfulness-based self-management therapy on the life satisfaction of teachers.


Keywords

Life Satisfaction, Mindfulness, Positive Emotion.
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  • Effect of Mindfulness based Self-management Therapy (MBSMT) on Life Satisfaction among Teachers

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Authors

Priyanka
Department of Applied Psychology, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar, Haryana, India
Sandeep Singh
Department of Applied Psychology, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar, Haryana, India

Abstract


Satisfaction in life is the ultimate goal of life. Satisfaction with life relates to positive outcomes of different domains of life like family, health, and job (Brief et al., 1993). In other words, how much the person likes his/her life which he/she is living is life satisfaction (Veenhoven, 1996). The present study explored the effect of mindfulness-based self-management therapy on life satisfaction among teachers. For the purpose of the study, thirty participants were selected on the basis of their low scores on the life satisfaction scale. Then nine weeks intervention was given to participants. The intervention programme of the MBSMT consists of four modules. In the first step awareness and acceptance skills were taught, the second step was about belief management, the third aspect of the intervention was related to the assessment of strengths and the last step was inculcating positive emotions. After the completion of the intervention the score on the life satisfaction variable was noted down. And analysis was made for the pre and post- assessment with the help of paired t-test, it has been observed that there is a significant difference in the mean score on the variable of life satisfaction among the participants. Further findings highlight the significant effect of mindfulness-based self-management therapy on the life satisfaction of teachers.


Keywords


Life Satisfaction, Mindfulness, Positive Emotion.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.15614/ijpp%2F2022%2Fv13i3%2F218230