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Effects of Positive Metacognitions and Positive Meta-emotions on Marital Communication


Affiliations
1 Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi Kashi Vidyapith, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India
     

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The present study was planned to explore the effects of positive metacognitions and positive meta-emotions in marital communication. The sample consisted of 300 married couples (300 husbands and 300 wives) chosen from Chowk and adjoining areas of Varanasi city of Uttar Pradesh, India. The participants were individually administered Hindi version of Positive Metacognitions and Positive Meta-emotions Questionnaire and Marital Communication Inventory. The participants falling below Mean-1SD and above Mean+1SD on the facets of positive metacognitions and meta-emotions were respectively designated as low and high scorer participants (husbands & wives) were screed out. The effects of levels (low & high) of positive metacognitions and meta-emotions on marital communications (supportive & aversive) were analyzed by applying 2 × 2 ANOVA (2 spouses × 2 levels of facets of positive metacognitions & positive meta-emotions). Results revealed non-significant main effects of spouses on supportive and aversive communications, and significant main effects of levels of PMCEQ-H1, PMCEQ-H2 and PMCEQ-H3 on supportive and aversive communications, except non-significant main effect of levels of PMCEQ- H3 on supportive communication. Participants who scored higher on the PMCEQ-H aspects exhibited significantly higher levels of supportive communication and lower levels of aversive communication than participants who scored lower. The results showed that more supporting communication and lower aversive communication were both caused by high levels of positive metacognitions and positive meta-emotions, respectively.


Keywords

Positive Metacognitions And Positive Meta-Emotions, Marital Communication, Supportive Communication.
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  • Effects of Positive Metacognitions and Positive Meta-emotions on Marital Communication

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Authors

Rashmi Rani
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi Kashi Vidyapith, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India
Arun Kumar Jaiswal
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi Kashi Vidyapith, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India

Abstract


The present study was planned to explore the effects of positive metacognitions and positive meta-emotions in marital communication. The sample consisted of 300 married couples (300 husbands and 300 wives) chosen from Chowk and adjoining areas of Varanasi city of Uttar Pradesh, India. The participants were individually administered Hindi version of Positive Metacognitions and Positive Meta-emotions Questionnaire and Marital Communication Inventory. The participants falling below Mean-1SD and above Mean+1SD on the facets of positive metacognitions and meta-emotions were respectively designated as low and high scorer participants (husbands & wives) were screed out. The effects of levels (low & high) of positive metacognitions and meta-emotions on marital communications (supportive & aversive) were analyzed by applying 2 × 2 ANOVA (2 spouses × 2 levels of facets of positive metacognitions & positive meta-emotions). Results revealed non-significant main effects of spouses on supportive and aversive communications, and significant main effects of levels of PMCEQ-H1, PMCEQ-H2 and PMCEQ-H3 on supportive and aversive communications, except non-significant main effect of levels of PMCEQ- H3 on supportive communication. Participants who scored higher on the PMCEQ-H aspects exhibited significantly higher levels of supportive communication and lower levels of aversive communication than participants who scored lower. The results showed that more supporting communication and lower aversive communication were both caused by high levels of positive metacognitions and positive meta-emotions, respectively.


Keywords


Positive Metacognitions And Positive Meta-Emotions, Marital Communication, Supportive Communication.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.15614/ijpp%2F2022%2Fv13i3%2F218240