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The Impact of Educational Games on the Rate of Learning Chemistry and Mathematical Concepts among Educable Intellectually Disabled Students


Affiliations
1 Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry Faculty of Education, Herat University, Herat, Afghanistan
2 Associate Professor, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Education, Herat University, Herat, Afghanistan
     

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The purpose of the research was to investigate the impact of educational games on the learning rate of mathematical concepts among educable intellectually disabled students. A Pseudo-experiment has taken place. Non-probability sampling was used and the sample size was 14 educable intellectually disabled students of two schools for students with special needs. The sample has been divided into two groups; each group was including 8 students. The experimental group was taught using games but the control group was taught like a normal class. The research instruments included four researcher constructed games and a pre-posttest which also been constructed by the researcher. The findings showed a significant difference in mean (p=0.025) between the experimental and control groups. There is also an increase in the mean of learning chemical and mathematical concepts among the experimental group. It is concluded that educational games can increase the rate of learning chemical and mathematical concepts among educable intellectually disabled students

Keywords

Educational Games, Learning, Mathematical Concepts, Chemical Concepts, Student, Intellectual Disability
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  • The Impact of Educational Games on the Rate of Learning Chemistry and Mathematical Concepts among Educable Intellectually Disabled Students

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Authors

Sayad Amiry
Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry Faculty of Education, Herat University, Herat, Afghanistan
Mohammad Zobair Azizi
Associate Professor, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Education, Herat University, Herat, Afghanistan

Abstract


The purpose of the research was to investigate the impact of educational games on the learning rate of mathematical concepts among educable intellectually disabled students. A Pseudo-experiment has taken place. Non-probability sampling was used and the sample size was 14 educable intellectually disabled students of two schools for students with special needs. The sample has been divided into two groups; each group was including 8 students. The experimental group was taught using games but the control group was taught like a normal class. The research instruments included four researcher constructed games and a pre-posttest which also been constructed by the researcher. The findings showed a significant difference in mean (p=0.025) between the experimental and control groups. There is also an increase in the mean of learning chemical and mathematical concepts among the experimental group. It is concluded that educational games can increase the rate of learning chemical and mathematical concepts among educable intellectually disabled students

Keywords


Educational Games, Learning, Mathematical Concepts, Chemical Concepts, Student, Intellectual Disability

References