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Menstrual Hygiene Practices, Socio-cultural Restrictions and Taboos among Indian Society and their Impact on Women Life


Affiliations
1 Department of Sociology, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar, Haryana, India
2 Department of Sociology, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar, Haryana, India
3 Department of Pathology, PGIMS, Rohtak, Haryana, India
     

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Menstruation is a natural physiological process that women only experience after they reach puberty. However, it has always been shrouded by taboos and superstitions that restrict women from participating in many socio-cultural aspects of their lives. Until now, menstruation is considered as taboo in India and associated with various myths and restrictions. Menstrual taboos and prohibitions affect girls’ and women's psychological health, perspective, lifestyle and most importantly, reproductive health. Girls' lack of awareness and understanding about adolescence, menstruation and their reproductive health makes it challenging to address menstruation's taboos and beliefs. The aim of this study is to bring attention to widespread menstrual myths/taboos and restrictions in India, as well as their menstrual hygiene practices and their impact on women's lives and health, as well as the importance of addressing these problems in basic care.

Keywords

Menstruation, Reproductive Health, Adolescent, Restrictions, Myths, Menstrual Taboos
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  • Menstrual Hygiene Practices, Socio-cultural Restrictions and Taboos among Indian Society and their Impact on Women Life

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Authors

Preeti
Department of Sociology, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar, Haryana, India
Vinod Kumari
Department of Sociology, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar, Haryana, India
Mahak
Department of Pathology, PGIMS, Rohtak, Haryana, India

Abstract


Menstruation is a natural physiological process that women only experience after they reach puberty. However, it has always been shrouded by taboos and superstitions that restrict women from participating in many socio-cultural aspects of their lives. Until now, menstruation is considered as taboo in India and associated with various myths and restrictions. Menstrual taboos and prohibitions affect girls’ and women's psychological health, perspective, lifestyle and most importantly, reproductive health. Girls' lack of awareness and understanding about adolescence, menstruation and their reproductive health makes it challenging to address menstruation's taboos and beliefs. The aim of this study is to bring attention to widespread menstrual myths/taboos and restrictions in India, as well as their menstrual hygiene practices and their impact on women's lives and health, as well as the importance of addressing these problems in basic care.

Keywords


Menstruation, Reproductive Health, Adolescent, Restrictions, Myths, Menstrual Taboos

References