Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access
Open Access Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Restricted Access Subscription Access

Effect of Loneliness and Stress among Afghan Students in India during COVID-19 Pandemic


Affiliations
1 MA Student, Psychology, Chandigarh University Mohali, Punjab, India
2 Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology Chandigarh University, Mohali, Punjab, India
     

   Subscribe/Renew Journal


The COVID-19 pandemic impacted almost everyone in the world. So, to prevent the virus from spreading as people were encouraged to self-quarantine in their homes. The lockdown had serious consequences on the mental health of people, causing issues such as stress, frustration, and depression. The psychological reactions of the people have a key role in influencing both the transmission of the disease and the occurrence of emotional anguish and social disorder during and after an infectious disease outbreak. Despite this, adequate resources are rarely provided to manage or mitigate the consequences of pandemics on mental health and well-being. Maladaptive behaviors, emotional distress, and defensive responses are all psychological responses to pandemics. Particularly those are more at risk who are genetically inclined to mental disease. According to surveys, the COVID-19 epidemic has influenced the state of friendship among many adults in the United States. Nearly 60% of young women said they lost contact with a few acquaintances during the pandemic, while 16% said they lost contact with most or all of their pals (Cherry, 2022). The mental health of people has suffered greatly as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The unprecedented level of uncertainty connected with the pandemic could contribute to stress and anxiety, particularly among people who have a high tolerance for uncertainty (Rettie & Daniels, 2021). The current study examined the experiences faced by students in higher education during the COVID-19 pandemic. To explore the effect of Loneliness and Stress among Afghan students in India during COVID-19 Pandemic a correlational study was conducted. 156 Afghan students (Bachelor's, Master's, & Ph.D. students) from age (18-25) years old living in India participated in this study. 7-item COVID-19 Student Stress Questionnaire (CSSQ) and UCLA Loneliness Scale (Version 3) were used in this study. Correlational analysis showed that there is a significant relationship between loneliness and stress. It was found that the level of stress among Afghan students living in India during a COVID-19 pandemic was moderate. Students reported rising mental health problems related to isolation, anxiety of social gatherings, and changes in connections with teachers and peers. And there was a high positive correlation between the three dimensions (isolation, relationship & academic life, & fear of contagion) of the 7-item COVID-19 Student Stress Questionnaire. It was also found that students were suffering from loneliness and isolation at a moderate level because, on the internet, students were no more able to reveal their "real" or inner self to others than they were in face-to-face settings. Therefore, situational factors like moving to a new place, physical isolation, and divorce can all cause loneliness in this context (David, 2015).

Keywords

Loneliness, Stress, COVID-19, Pandemic
Subscription Login to verify subscription
User
Notifications
Font Size


  • Barnes, S. (2021). 6 signs feeling lonely has become a bigger issue (& how to fix it). Huff Post. Retrieved from https://www.huffpost.com/entry/signs-feeling-lonely-biggerissue l 6040eba9c5b617a7e4133463
  • Cherry, K. (2021). Loneliness: Causes and health consequence. Very well mind. Retrieved from https://www.verywellmind.com/loneliness-causes-effects-andtreatments2795749
  • David, S.A. (2015). Divorce and health. Psychosomatic Medicine, 77(3), 227-236. Doi: 10.1097/PSY.0000000000000168
  • Felman, A. (2020). Why does stress happen and how to manage it? Medical News Today. Retrieved from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/145855
  • Hwang, T. J., Rabheru, K., Peisah, C., Reichman, W., & Ikeda, M. (2020). Loneliness and social isolation during the COVID-19 pandemic. International Psychogeriatrics, 32(10), 1217-1220. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1041610220000988
  • Hunt, M.G., Marx, R., Lipson, C., & Young J. (2018). No more FOMO: Limiting social media decreases loneliness and depression. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 37(10), 751-768. Doi:10.1521/jscp.2018.37.10.751
  • Indra, G. H., Radyani, A. M., & Oriza, I.I.D. (April 12, 2021). The relationship between stress and well-being: The mediating roles of students' psychological flexibility and loneliness during the coronavirus pandemic. Psychological Research on Urban Society, 4(1), 3-14. DOI: 10.7454/Proust. V4i1.63
  • Kumar, A., Gupta, P.K., & Srivastava, A. (2020). A review of modern technologies for tackling the COVID-19 pandemic. Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews, 14(4), 569-573. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dsx.2020.05.008
  • Klslev, E. (2020). COVID-19 and Loneliness Two new studies bring contradicting results regarding COVID-19 and loneliness. Psychology Today. Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl/blog/happy-singlehood/202011/covid-19and-loneliness
  • Khan, M., & Kadoya, Y. (2021). Loneliness during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Comparison between Older and Younger People. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18(15), 7871. https://doi.org/10.3390/ ijerph18157871
  • Keyserlingk, L.V., Pedroza, K.Y., Arum, R., & Eccles, JS. (2022). The stress of university students before and after campus closure in response to COVID-19. Wiley Online Library, 50, 1. Https://doi.org/10.1002/jcop.22561
  • Liu, S., Lithopoulos, A., Zhang, C.Q., Barrera, M.A.G., & Rhodes, R.E. (2020). Personality and perceived stress during COVID-19 pandemic: Testing the mediating role of perceived threat and efficacy. Personality and Individual Differences, 168, 110351. Https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2020.110351
  • Labrague, L.J. (2021). Psychological resilience, coping behaviours and social support among health care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic: A systematic review of quantitative studies. Journal of Nursing Management, 29(7), 1893-1905. DOI: 10.1111/jonm.13336
  • Legg, T.J. (2020). Everything you need to know about stress. Healthline. Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/health/stress
  • Mazza, C., Ricci, E., Biondi, S., Colasanti, M., Ferracuti, S., Napoli, C., & Roma, P. (2020). A nationwide survey of psychological distress among Italian people during the COVID-19 pandemic: Immediate psychological responses and associated factors. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(9), 3165. Https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/17/9/3165
  • Petitte, T., Mallow, J., Barnes, E., Petrone, A., Barr, T., & Theeke, L. (2015). A systematic review of loneliness and common chronic physical conditions in adults. The Open Psychology Journal, 8, 113-132. https://doi.org/10.2174/187435010 1508010113
  • Quintiliani, L., Sisto, A., Vicinanza, F., Curcio, G., & Tambone, V. (2022). Resilience and psychological impact on Italian university students during COVID-19 pandemic. Distance Learning and Health, Psychology, Health and Medicine, 27(1), 69-80. DOI: 10.1080/13548506.2021.1891266
  • Saxena, J. (2021). What are the signs of loneliness and symptoms you shouldn't ignore? Better help. Retrieved from https://www.betterhelp.com/advice/loneliness/whatare-the-signs-of-loneliness-and-symptoms-you-shouldnt-ignore/
  • Scott, E. (2020). What is stress? Very well mind. Retrieved from https://www.verywellmind.com/stress-and-health-3145086
  • Tilburg, T.G.V., Steinmetz, S., Stolte, E., Roest, H.V.D., & Vries, D.H.D. (2021). Loneliness and mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic: A study among dutch older adults. The Journal of Gerontology, 76, 7. https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbaa111
  • Tiwari, S.C. (2013). Loneliness: A disease? Indian Journal of Psychiatric, 55(4), 320-322. Doi: 10.4103/0019-5545.120536
  • Waters, S. (2021). Types of stress and what you can do to fight with them. Better Up. Retrieved from https://www.betterup.com/blog/types-of-stress

Abstract Views: 22

PDF Views: 0




  • Effect of Loneliness and Stress among Afghan Students in India during COVID-19 Pandemic

Abstract Views: 22  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Lida Mansoor
MA Student, Psychology, Chandigarh University Mohali, Punjab, India
Yagyima Nehabala
Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology Chandigarh University, Mohali, Punjab, India

Abstract


The COVID-19 pandemic impacted almost everyone in the world. So, to prevent the virus from spreading as people were encouraged to self-quarantine in their homes. The lockdown had serious consequences on the mental health of people, causing issues such as stress, frustration, and depression. The psychological reactions of the people have a key role in influencing both the transmission of the disease and the occurrence of emotional anguish and social disorder during and after an infectious disease outbreak. Despite this, adequate resources are rarely provided to manage or mitigate the consequences of pandemics on mental health and well-being. Maladaptive behaviors, emotional distress, and defensive responses are all psychological responses to pandemics. Particularly those are more at risk who are genetically inclined to mental disease. According to surveys, the COVID-19 epidemic has influenced the state of friendship among many adults in the United States. Nearly 60% of young women said they lost contact with a few acquaintances during the pandemic, while 16% said they lost contact with most or all of their pals (Cherry, 2022). The mental health of people has suffered greatly as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The unprecedented level of uncertainty connected with the pandemic could contribute to stress and anxiety, particularly among people who have a high tolerance for uncertainty (Rettie & Daniels, 2021). The current study examined the experiences faced by students in higher education during the COVID-19 pandemic. To explore the effect of Loneliness and Stress among Afghan students in India during COVID-19 Pandemic a correlational study was conducted. 156 Afghan students (Bachelor's, Master's, & Ph.D. students) from age (18-25) years old living in India participated in this study. 7-item COVID-19 Student Stress Questionnaire (CSSQ) and UCLA Loneliness Scale (Version 3) were used in this study. Correlational analysis showed that there is a significant relationship between loneliness and stress. It was found that the level of stress among Afghan students living in India during a COVID-19 pandemic was moderate. Students reported rising mental health problems related to isolation, anxiety of social gatherings, and changes in connections with teachers and peers. And there was a high positive correlation between the three dimensions (isolation, relationship & academic life, & fear of contagion) of the 7-item COVID-19 Student Stress Questionnaire. It was also found that students were suffering from loneliness and isolation at a moderate level because, on the internet, students were no more able to reveal their "real" or inner self to others than they were in face-to-face settings. Therefore, situational factors like moving to a new place, physical isolation, and divorce can all cause loneliness in this context (David, 2015).

Keywords


Loneliness, Stress, COVID-19, Pandemic

References