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Linkage between Board Structure and HR Disclosure: An Analysis in the Indian Context


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1 Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar, Haryana, India
     

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The study examines the linkage between board structure and Human Resource (HR) disclosure of listed companies in the National Stock Exchange (NSE-200 Index). A sample of 125 firms are studied from F.Y. 2012-13 to 2020-21. The data is collected from annual reports and Centre for Monitoring Indian Economy (CMIE) ProwessIQ Database. Two-Way Least Square Dummy Variable (LSDV) regression model is employed for testing the model. The outcomes revealed that board size, board meeting, company size, and total number of pages of an annual report establish the link with HR disclosure. The study provides the feedback to different regulatory bodies, such as the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India (ICAI), about the adequacy of current guidelines on HR disclosure for Indian corporates. The HRDI used in the study would be used by businesses as a yardstick to strengthen their HR disclosure in the future. The present study provides the important information regarding HR disclosure to various stakeholders of a company (employees, investors, and so on). Based on HR disclosure, investors can easily and better understand the future potentials of a company.

Keywords

Board Structure, HR Disclosure, Annual Report, Content Analysis, India
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  • Linkage between Board Structure and HR Disclosure: An Analysis in the Indian Context

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Authors

Kirti Aggarwal
Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar, Haryana, India

Abstract


The study examines the linkage between board structure and Human Resource (HR) disclosure of listed companies in the National Stock Exchange (NSE-200 Index). A sample of 125 firms are studied from F.Y. 2012-13 to 2020-21. The data is collected from annual reports and Centre for Monitoring Indian Economy (CMIE) ProwessIQ Database. Two-Way Least Square Dummy Variable (LSDV) regression model is employed for testing the model. The outcomes revealed that board size, board meeting, company size, and total number of pages of an annual report establish the link with HR disclosure. The study provides the feedback to different regulatory bodies, such as the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India (ICAI), about the adequacy of current guidelines on HR disclosure for Indian corporates. The HRDI used in the study would be used by businesses as a yardstick to strengthen their HR disclosure in the future. The present study provides the important information regarding HR disclosure to various stakeholders of a company (employees, investors, and so on). Based on HR disclosure, investors can easily and better understand the future potentials of a company.

Keywords


Board Structure, HR Disclosure, Annual Report, Content Analysis, India

References