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A Study on Assessment of Satisfaction Level of Women towards Entrepreneurship Development Training Programme: Evidence from Districts of Uttar Pradesh


Affiliations
1 Assistant Professor, Department of Business Administration, Jamia Hamdard University, New Delhi, India
2 Assistant Professor, Department of Commerce, Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti Language University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
     

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The entrepreneurship development programme of government and non-government organisations aims at the generation of income and improving the standard of living of members. It consists of packages of incentives, subsidies, concessions, infrastructural facilities, technical, managerial guidance, training, etc., through a network of organisations for supporting entrepreneurship development (Solanki et al., 2018). The Government of India is offering easy loans for self-employment purpose to deal with the problem of unemployment, women empowerment, and economic growth. To achieve the objective, mere allocation of finances is not sufficient as it may lead to misuse of funds so the microfinance institutions besides allocating funds also offer training programmes to its beneficiaries. The present study tries to identify the development of basic skills among the beneficiaries and their satisfaction level towards these training programmes which is essential for the development of skills to utilise of funds for productive purposes leading to self-employment and income generation. The study is conducted at three districts of Uttar Pradesh, i.e., Lucknow, Barabanki, and Raebarelli. The responses of 75 women beneficiaries of training programmes from microfinance institutions were collected through field work. The study finds out that microfinance institutions play an important role in the development of entrepreneurial skills among its beneficiaries by imparting training and counselling & guidance sessions for self-employment and income generation and most of the beneficiaries are found to be highly satisfied with the training programme.

Keywords

Microfinance, Standard Of Living, Training Programme, Skill Development, Self-employment
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  • A Study on Assessment of Satisfaction Level of Women towards Entrepreneurship Development Training Programme: Evidence from Districts of Uttar Pradesh

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Authors

Syeedun Nisa
Assistant Professor, Department of Business Administration, Jamia Hamdard University, New Delhi, India
Zaibun Nisa
Assistant Professor, Department of Commerce, Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti Language University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India

Abstract


The entrepreneurship development programme of government and non-government organisations aims at the generation of income and improving the standard of living of members. It consists of packages of incentives, subsidies, concessions, infrastructural facilities, technical, managerial guidance, training, etc., through a network of organisations for supporting entrepreneurship development (Solanki et al., 2018). The Government of India is offering easy loans for self-employment purpose to deal with the problem of unemployment, women empowerment, and economic growth. To achieve the objective, mere allocation of finances is not sufficient as it may lead to misuse of funds so the microfinance institutions besides allocating funds also offer training programmes to its beneficiaries. The present study tries to identify the development of basic skills among the beneficiaries and their satisfaction level towards these training programmes which is essential for the development of skills to utilise of funds for productive purposes leading to self-employment and income generation. The study is conducted at three districts of Uttar Pradesh, i.e., Lucknow, Barabanki, and Raebarelli. The responses of 75 women beneficiaries of training programmes from microfinance institutions were collected through field work. The study finds out that microfinance institutions play an important role in the development of entrepreneurial skills among its beneficiaries by imparting training and counselling & guidance sessions for self-employment and income generation and most of the beneficiaries are found to be highly satisfied with the training programme.

Keywords


Microfinance, Standard Of Living, Training Programme, Skill Development, Self-employment

References