Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access

Examining the Mediating Role of Peer Support, Manager Support, and Family Support on Occupational Stress


Affiliations
1 Research Scholar, Department of Business Administration, Annamalai University, Chidambaram, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Associate Professor, Department of Business Administration, Annamalai University, Chidambaram, Tamil Nadu, India
3 Associate Professor, Department of Management Studies, Sri Manakula Vinayagar Engineering College, Puducherry, India

   Subscribe/Renew Journal


In occupational stress research, the mediating functions of peer support, manager support, and family support have not been adequately studied to determine their likely intervening impacts. Based on the JCDS theory, the present research examines a model to assess the relevance of these components in occupational stress and its antecedents (Job demand, Job control, and role clarity). Responses from an online survey of 441 academic faculty members from various Indian higher educational institutions suggest that Family support mediated Job demand, Job control, role clarity, and their potential influence on Occupational stress is significant. The relationship between Occupational stress and its antecedents (Job demand, Job control, and Role clarity) mediated by Peer support has also had a significant impact on managing occupational stress. At the same time, the association between Occupational Stress and Manager Support did not significantly mediate its Antecedents. The importance of lowering the harmful effect of occupational stress in the academic institution context was explored. The findings and their theory and practice implications and future study techniques to better our understanding of occupational stress are discussed further.

Keywords

Occupational Stress, Manager Support, Family Support, Peer Support, Job Demand, Job Control, Role Clarity
Subscription Login to verify subscription
User
Notifications
Font Size


  • Abraham, R. (2000). The role of job control as a moderator of emotional dissonance and emotional intelligence–outcome relationships. The Journal of Psychology, 134(2), 169-184.
  • Adepoju, A., & Adeniji, A. (2020). Technology acceptance of e-banking services in an unnatural environment. SEISENSE Journal of Management, 3(3), 34-50.
  • Aghdasi, S., Kiamanesh, A. R., & Ebrahim, A. N. (2011). Emotional intelligence and organizational commitment: Testing the mediatory role of occupational stress and job satisfaction. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences, 29, 1965-1976.
  • Ahluwalia, A. K., & Preet, K. (2019). The influence of motivation and locus of control on commitment: An empirical study amongst the state university teachers. IUP Journal of Organizational Behavior, 18(1).
  • Asif, M., Qing, M., Hwang, J., & Shi, H. (2019). Ethical leadership, affective commitment, work engagement, and creativity: Testing a multiple mediation approach. Sustainability, 11(16), 4489.
  • Asrar-ul-Haq, M., Ali, H. Y., Anwar, S., Iqbal, A., Iqbal, M. B., Suleman, N., Sadiq, I., & Haris-ul-Mahasbi, M. (2019). Impact of organizational politics on employee work outcomes in higher education institutions of Pakistan: Moderating role of social capital. South Asian Journal of Business Studies.
  • Bakker, A. B., & de Vries, J. D. (2021). Job demands-resources theory and self-regulation: New explanations and remedies for job burnout. Anxiety, Stress, & Coping, 34(1), 1-21.
  • Bayram, N., & Bilgel, N. (2008). The prevalence and socio-demographic correlations of depression, anxiety and stress among a group of university students. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 43(8), 667-672.
  • Berjot, S., & Gillet, N. (2011). Stress and coping with discrimination and stigmatization. Frontiers in Psychology, 2, 33.
  • Bodla, M. A., & Nawaz, M. M. (2010). Comparative study of full-range leadership model among faculty members in public and private sector higher education institutes and universities. International Journal of Business and Management, 5(4), 208.
  • Bolliger, L., Lukan, J., Colman, E., Boersma, L., Luštrek, M., de Bacquer, D., & Clays, E. (2022). Sources of occupational stress among office workers - A focus group study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19(3), 1075.
  • Bowen, P., Edwards, P., Lingard, H., & Cattell, K. (2014). Occupational stress and job demand, control and support factors among construction project consultants. International Journal of Project Management, 32(7), 1273-1284.
  • Brough, P., Drummond, S., & Biggs, A. (2018). Job support, coping, and control: Assessment of simultaneous impacts within the occupational stress process. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 23(2), 188.
  • Daumiller, M., & Dresel, M. (2018). Subjective perceptions of the teaching– research nexus and occupational stress at universities. Zeitschrift Für Entwicklungspsychologie Und Pädagogische Psychologie.
  • De Paula, A. V., & Boas, A. A. V. (2017). Well-being and quality of working life of university professors in Brazil. Quality of Life and Quality of Working Life, 187-210.
  • Demerouti, E., Bakker, A. B., Nachreiner, F., & Schaufeli, W. B. (2001). The job demands-resources model of burnout. Journal of Applied Psychology, 86(3), 499-512.
  • Devi, P., & Lahkar, N. (2021). Occupational stress and job performance among university library professionals of North-East India. Evidence- Based Library and Information Practice, 16(2), 2-21.
  • Dianat, I., Azemi, S., Abdollahazade, F., Bazazan, A., & Jafarabadi, M. A. (2021). Does self-efficacy mediate the relationship between occupational stress and mental health problems? A study among nursing professionals. Health Promotion Perspectives, 11(3), 344-350.
  • Elovainio, M., Kivimäki, M., & Helkama, K. (2001). Organizational justice evaluations, job control, and occupational strain. Journal of Applied Psychology, 86(3), 418-424.
  • Fazaeli, S., Yousefi, M., Jamali, J., & Ebrahimi, Z. (2021). Evaluation of occupational stress and hospital support for nurses caring for COVID-19 patients: Comparison between nurses with experience of patient care in infectious and non-infectious wards. Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal, 23(5).
  • Fetherston, C., Fetherston, A., Batt, S., Sully, M., & Wei, R. (2021). Well- being and work-life merge in Australian and U.K. academics. Studies in Higher Education, 46(12), 2774-2788.
  • Haly, M. K. (2009). A review of contemporary research on the relationship between occupational stress and social support: Where are we now? The Australasian Journal of Organisational Psychology, 2, 44-63.
  • Handy, J. A. (1988). Theoretical and methodological problems within occupational stress and burnout research. Human Relations, 41(5), 351-369.
  • Hemmings, B., & Woodcock, S. (2011). Preservice teachers’ views of inclusive education: A content analysis. Australasian Journal of Special Education, 35(2), 103-116.
  • Hughes, S., Iesue, L., de Ortega Bárcenas, H. F., Sandoval, J. C., & Lozano, J. C. (2021). Coping with occupational stress in journalism: professional identities and advocacy as resources. Journalism Studies, 22(8), 971-991.
  • Ivancevich, J. M., & Donnelly Jr, J. H. (1974). A study of role clarity and need for clarity for three occupational groups. Academy of Management Journal, 17(1), 28-36.
  • Jerg-Bretzke, L., Limbrecht-Ecklundt, K., Walter, S., Spohrs, J., & Beschoner, P. (2020). Correlations of the “work-family conflict” with occupational stress - A cross-sectional study among university employees. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 11, 134.
  • Kabito, G. G., & Wami, S. D. (2020). Perceived work-related stress and its associated factors among public secondary school teachers in Gondar city: A cross-sectional study from Ethiopia. BMC Research Notes, 13(1), 1-7.
  • Kappagoda, U. (2013). Emotional intelligence as a predictor of work- family conflict among school teachers in North Central Province in Sri Lanka. Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Management and Economics-2013, University of Ruhuna, Sri Lanka. Karasek, R., Brisson, C., Kawakami, N., Houtman, I., Bongers, P., & Amick, B. (1998). The Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ): An instrument for internationally comparative assessments of psychosocial job characteristics. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 3(4), 322-355.
  • Lecca, L. I., Finstad, G. L., Traversini, V., Lulli, L. G., Gualco, B., & Taddei, G. (2020). The role of job support as a target for the management of work-related stress: The state of art. Quality-Access to Success, 21(174).
  • Lee, M., Coutts, R., Fielden, J., Hutchinson, M., Lakeman, R., Mathisen, B., Nasrawi, D., & Phillips, N. (2022). Occupational stress in University academics in Australia and New Zealand. Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, 44(1), 57-71.
  • Manshor, A. T., Fontaine, R., & Choy, C. S. (2003). Occupational stress among managers: A Malaysian survey. Journal of Managerial Psychology.
  • Marcatto, F., di Blas, L., Luis, O., Festa, S., & Ferrante, D. (2021). The perceived occupational stress scale: A brief tool for measuring workers’ perceptions of stress at work. European Journal of Psychological Assessment.
  • Montgomery, A. J., Panagopolou, E., & Benos, A. (2006). Work-family interference as a mediator between job demands and job burnout among doctors. Stress and Health: Journal of the International Society for the Investigation of Stress, 22(3), 203-212.
  • Mudrak, J., Zabrodska, K., Kveton, P., Jelinek, M., Blatny, M., Solcova, I., & Machovcova, K. (2018). Occupational well-being among university faculty: A job demands-resources model. Research in Higher Education, 59(3), 325-348.
  • Nasser, R. (2017). Qatar’s educational reform past and future: Challenges in teacher development. Open Review of Educational Research, 4(1), 1-19.
  • Obbarius, N., Fischer, F., Liegl, G., Obbarius, A., & Rose, M. (2021). A modified version of the transactional stress concept according to Lazarus and Folkman was confirmed in a psychosomatic inpatient sample. Frontiers in Psychology, 12, 405.
  • Othman, A. K., Abdullah, M. Z., Mohamad, M., Ahmad, F., Rozalli, S. A., & Izlanin, N. A. N. (2018). The mediating role of emotional exhaustion on the relationship between job factors and turnover intention among service employees. Proceedings of the 2nd Advances in Business Research International Conference, 221-231.
  • Panatik, S., Rajab, A., Shaari, R., Shah, I. M., Rahman, H. A., & Badri, S. Z. (2012). Impact of work-related stress on well-being among academician in Malaysian Research University. International Conference on Education and Management Innovation, 30, 37-41.
  • Pozo-Antúnez, D., Joaquín, J., Ariza-Montes, A., Fernández-Navarro, F., & Molina-Sánchez, H. (2018). Effect of a job demand-control- social support model on accounting professionals’ health perception.
  • International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15(11), 2437.
  • Preacher, K. J., & Hayes, A. F. (2004). SPSS and SAS procedures for estimating indirect effects in simple mediation models. Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, & Computers, 36(4), 717-731.
  • Preacher, K. J., & Hayes, A. F. (2008). Contemporary approaches to assessing mediation in communication research. In A. F. Hayes, M. D. Slater, & L. B. Snyder (Eds.), The Sage Sourcebook of Advanced Data Analysis Methods for Communication Research (pp. 13-54). Sage Publications, Inc. doi:https://doi.org/10.4135/9781452272054. n2
  • Purnama, D. S., Shaikh, M., Farozin, M., & Astuti, B. (2021). A study of occupational stress among university academic staff in Indonesia and Malaysia. Parikalpana: KIIT Journal of Management, 17(1).
  • Richards, K. A. R., Wilson, W. J., Holland, S. K., & Haegele, J. A. (2020). The relationships among perceived organization support, resilience, perceived mattering, emotional exhaustion, and job satisfaction in adapted physical educators. Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, 37(1), 90-111.
  • Said, R. M., & El-Shafei, D. A. (2021). Occupational stress, job satisfaction, and intent to leave: Nurses working on front lines during COVID-19 pandemic in Zagazig City, Egypt. Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 28(7), 8791-8801.
  • Schutz, R. W., & Long, B. C. (1988). Confirmatory factor analysis, validation and revision of a teacher stress inventory. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 48(2), 497-511.
  • Semmer, N., Jacobshagen, N., Meier, L., & Elfering, A. H. (2007). Occupational stress research: The stress-as-offense-to-self perspective.
  • Shen, P., & Slater, P. (2021). The effect of occupational stress and coping strategies on mental health and emotional well-being among university academic staff during the COVID-19 outbreak. International Education Studies, 14(3), 82-95.
  • Shern, D. L., Blanch, A. K., & Steverman, S. M. (2016). Toxic stress, behavioral health, and the next major era in public health. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 86(2), 109-123.
  • Singh, C., Jackson, D., Munro, I., & Cross, W. (2022). Job experiences, challenges, revelations and narratives of nurse academics: A qualitative study. Journal of Advanced Nursing.
  • Spielberger, C. D., Vagg, P. R., & Wasala, C. F. (2003). Occupational stress: Job pressures and lack of support.
  • Taber, K. S. (2018). The use of Cronbach’s alpha when developing and reporting research instruments in science education. Research in Science Education, 48(6), 1273-1296.
  • Tquabo, N. A., Gebregziabher, N. K., Tesfaldet, I. E., Misghina, H. M., Russom, T. F., & Weldemariam, M. D. (2021). Occupational stress and associated factors among college instructors in Eritrea: A cross- sectional study 2019. Population Medicine, 3(March), 1-9.
  • Winefield, A. H., & Jarrett, R. (2001). Occupational stress in university staff. International Journal of Stress Management, 8(4), 285-298.
  • Wong, J.-Y., Lin, J.-H., Liu, S.-H., & Wan, T.-H. (2014). Fireman’s job stress: integrating work/non-work conflict with job demand-control- support model. European Review of Applied Psychology, 64(2), 83-91.
  • Wu, G., Hu, Z., & Zheng, J. (2019). Role stress, job burnout, and job performance in construction project managers: The moderating role of career calling. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(13), 2394.

Abstract Views: 226




  • Examining the Mediating Role of Peer Support, Manager Support, and Family Support on Occupational Stress

Abstract Views: 226  | 

Authors

Mathiazhagan A.
Research Scholar, Department of Business Administration, Annamalai University, Chidambaram, Tamil Nadu, India
Nagarajan S. K.
Associate Professor, Department of Business Administration, Annamalai University, Chidambaram, Tamil Nadu, India
Elamurugan Balasundaram
Associate Professor, Department of Management Studies, Sri Manakula Vinayagar Engineering College, Puducherry, India

Abstract


In occupational stress research, the mediating functions of peer support, manager support, and family support have not been adequately studied to determine their likely intervening impacts. Based on the JCDS theory, the present research examines a model to assess the relevance of these components in occupational stress and its antecedents (Job demand, Job control, and role clarity). Responses from an online survey of 441 academic faculty members from various Indian higher educational institutions suggest that Family support mediated Job demand, Job control, role clarity, and their potential influence on Occupational stress is significant. The relationship between Occupational stress and its antecedents (Job demand, Job control, and Role clarity) mediated by Peer support has also had a significant impact on managing occupational stress. At the same time, the association between Occupational Stress and Manager Support did not significantly mediate its Antecedents. The importance of lowering the harmful effect of occupational stress in the academic institution context was explored. The findings and their theory and practice implications and future study techniques to better our understanding of occupational stress are discussed further.

Keywords


Occupational Stress, Manager Support, Family Support, Peer Support, Job Demand, Job Control, Role Clarity

References