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Transition in Industrial Relations: Case of a Private Steel Maker in India


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1 Centre for Human Resources Management and Labor Relations, School of Management and Labor Studies, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai., India
     

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Beginning from the 1990s Industrial Relations in India has been challenged to move out of relevance. This study deals with the case of the largest private steel maker in India. The company in its bid to maintain competitiveness in a new business environment altered the dy namics betwe en worker- employer and worker-worker relations. We find that the changes have brought about a dent in the long-established Industrial Relations practices in the organization. However, the company has managed to subdue the wave of large-scale worker resentment by having built a proworker image. The changes in the Industrial Relations scenario in the company calls for a relook at new forms of relationship that thrives amid the ‘fractured’ Industrial Relations dynamics.

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  • Transition in Industrial Relations: Case of a Private Steel Maker in India

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Authors

Johnson Abhishek Minz
Centre for Human Resources Management and Labor Relations, School of Management and Labor Studies, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai., India

Abstract


Beginning from the 1990s Industrial Relations in India has been challenged to move out of relevance. This study deals with the case of the largest private steel maker in India. The company in its bid to maintain competitiveness in a new business environment altered the dy namics betwe en worker- employer and worker-worker relations. We find that the changes have brought about a dent in the long-established Industrial Relations practices in the organization. However, the company has managed to subdue the wave of large-scale worker resentment by having built a proworker image. The changes in the Industrial Relations scenario in the company calls for a relook at new forms of relationship that thrives amid the ‘fractured’ Industrial Relations dynamics.

Keywords


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References