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Micronutrient Fortified Carbohydrate Supplementation and Speed, Agility and Power in Indian Adolescent Athletes


Affiliations
1 GSK Human Performance Lab, United Kingdom
2 GSK Consumer Healthcare, Gurgaon, India
3 GSK Human Performance Lab, India
4 Jehangir Clinical Development Centre Pvt., Pune, Maharashtra, India
     

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The positive performance impact of exogenous carbohydrate intake on prolonged endurance is well established. The effect on shorter duration activities has been less documented, in particular with adolescents. In this randomized, cross over study, thirty adolescent athletes (24 male and 6 female; age: 13.5 ± 1.0 yrs; height: 161.4 ± 8.1cm; weight: 50.4 ± 9.3 kg) performed the same sequence of procedures; baseline assessments, a treatment drink before and after a 45 min intermittent exercise protocol followed by post-baseline assessments. Participants were randomised to one of three blinded treatment drinks; micronutrient fortified carbohydrate (CHO), calorie-matched control (PRO) or water (WAT). The assessments involved repeated sprint and repeated agility tests (6 repetitions; 65 sec. provided to complete the repetition and recover prior to the next effort) and a repeated Wingate anaerobic test (3 x 30 sec) on a cycle ergometer. The Fatigue Index (FI) was calculated from the sprint and agility results and Mean Power Output (MPO) from the repeated Wingate results. The difference between the baseline and post-baseline results was then calculated and CHO, PRO and WAT treatment groups compared using Analysis of variance (ANOVA). No significant differences were found between speed, agility and power change from baseline results when CHO, PRO and WAT treatment groups were compared (p ≥ 0.05). Supplementation with a micronutrient fortified carbohydrate beverage does not increase repeated speed, agility or power in Indian adolescent team sport athletes.

Keywords

Agility, Speed, Power, Carbohydrate, Performance, Development, Adolescents, Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LIST).
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  • Micronutrient Fortified Carbohydrate Supplementation and Speed, Agility and Power in Indian Adolescent Athletes

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Authors

Tessa E. Morris
GSK Human Performance Lab, United Kingdom
Rachana Bhoite
GSK Consumer Healthcare, Gurgaon, India
Ritu Karwal
GSK Consumer Healthcare, Gurgaon, India
Verma
GSK Human Performance Lab, United Kingdom
Bhavna
GSK Consumer Healthcare, Gurgaon, India
Khadilkar
GSK Human Performance Lab, India
Anuradha
Jehangir Clinical Development Centre Pvt., Pune, Maharashtra, India

Abstract


The positive performance impact of exogenous carbohydrate intake on prolonged endurance is well established. The effect on shorter duration activities has been less documented, in particular with adolescents. In this randomized, cross over study, thirty adolescent athletes (24 male and 6 female; age: 13.5 ± 1.0 yrs; height: 161.4 ± 8.1cm; weight: 50.4 ± 9.3 kg) performed the same sequence of procedures; baseline assessments, a treatment drink before and after a 45 min intermittent exercise protocol followed by post-baseline assessments. Participants were randomised to one of three blinded treatment drinks; micronutrient fortified carbohydrate (CHO), calorie-matched control (PRO) or water (WAT). The assessments involved repeated sprint and repeated agility tests (6 repetitions; 65 sec. provided to complete the repetition and recover prior to the next effort) and a repeated Wingate anaerobic test (3 x 30 sec) on a cycle ergometer. The Fatigue Index (FI) was calculated from the sprint and agility results and Mean Power Output (MPO) from the repeated Wingate results. The difference between the baseline and post-baseline results was then calculated and CHO, PRO and WAT treatment groups compared using Analysis of variance (ANOVA). No significant differences were found between speed, agility and power change from baseline results when CHO, PRO and WAT treatment groups were compared (p ≥ 0.05). Supplementation with a micronutrient fortified carbohydrate beverage does not increase repeated speed, agility or power in Indian adolescent team sport athletes.

Keywords


Agility, Speed, Power, Carbohydrate, Performance, Development, Adolescents, Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LIST).

References